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Exercise, Gym, Physio, Tendons

Should I Exercise when injured? Ask the Physiotherapist

Should I Exercise when injured? Ask the Physiotherapist

Should I stay away from the Gym while I get better? Absolutely not!

A lot of our physiotherapy and exercise patients are concerned about abandoning their regular fitness regime, particularly when injured and experiencing pain. Let’s get one thing straight – the days of a physiotherapist suggesting you should avoid activity are long gone. You should most certainly continue turning up at the gym, in fact we’re probably going to push you there! We will simply look at tweaking some of the programme you are working through. While rest is always a good thing for the human body, strength and exercise are a vital component of rehabilitation.

Tendons respond to loading … But not too much!!

Tendon damage is a very frequent issue presenting in clinic at www.personalhealth.ie.

A tendon is where the muscle attaches to bone. If you imagine a juicy steak – the grizzly bits in by the bone are tendons. A juicy muscle belly is rich in blood vessels, which promote healing once our circulation is good. However the tendons (the grizzly bit) have less blood supply and therefore take longer to heal. Tendons do get better, no need for alarm. They are just a bit more complex. They respond to various forms of therapy and rehabilitation – one such approach is increased loading to help the healing process. Just not too much… and correct technique is vital.

Inflammation vs tissue damage

Tendons can be overworked or overloaded and as a result they become inflamed. There may not be actual tissue damage such as a partial tear/rupture. However, the inflammation caused by excessive loading can be a real irritation.

Running on a dodgy ankle

Think about some long distance running on a dodgy ankle. This might cause the achilles tendon to become inflamed – referred to as a tendinopathy. Sometimes the inflammation in the tendon is mechanical in nature. This means the problem is caused by incorrect mechanics when we run. The solution, while a very keen runner may not like to hear it, might be to reduce time on the road and go to the gym.

Strengthening and Lengthening

Strengthening and lengthening the damaged tissue is a key factor in rehabilitation. No better place than the gym for this. If you are worried about technique, frequency, sets, reps, loading, tempo, duration, rest or any of the above – we can help.

  • Firstly, we will walk you through the process in clinic.
  • Secondly, we will send on all the exercises from our video library
  • Thirdly, we can monitor your progress from afar, but with room for a helping hand
  • Finally, we will discharge you back to healthy happy living as soon as we possibly can

So in order to get yourself back out on the roads, or back in the gym, come to Personal Health….

Book Online here: https://personalhealth.janeapp.com/

 

Football, Physio, sport, Physiotherapy, Fitness

Will Jonathan Walters be fit for Saturday ? by Ronan Fallon

Well is he going to be fit to continue?

Last night’s match in Paris saw the boys in green put in a great performance on the European stage. It’s fair to say that we could have easily taken all three points. Unfortunately, this result did have an impact on Jonathan Walters.

It is well known that he has been struggling with an Achilles tendon problem for the last few weeks. The Achilles tendon is the common tendon from the calf muscles into the heel bone.
It is a notoriously tricky problem for anyone from an international footballer to a mid-week 5-a-side social footballer or tag rugby player. As such, it was not a good sign that Jonathan Walters reported last night that he was struggling with this issue from the very first minute!

Achilles tendon
As you can see from the image, pretty much all activity on the football pitch requires load to go from the calf muscle and through your Achilles tendon. This allows the athlete to propel forward to run & jump.

 

MANAGEMENT

Chartered Physiotherapy Dublin 6

Decisions Decisions…..

There is no doubt that the Irish medical team are using all of the resources at their disposal in an effort to get Jonathan fit for Saturday. This is a very quick turnaround for an injured achilles such as this one.
I suspect that they will be using a battery of treatments including anti-inflammatories, Icing, Soft tissue for the calf muscles and most importantly rest.
The crucial component in this management strategy is controlling loading. Thai is the weight that he takes through that inflamed tendon. He should be on crutches for 48 hours. This would allow the Achilles to recover without the stress of his bodyweight on every step.

Medical Team

This is a tricky conundrum for the medical team today. How long can they afford to rest Jonathan from team training in preparation for the Belgium match? Martin O’Neill and his team will have  already discussed this and may have even made a decision on ruling him out.
It’s very difficult to see how Jonathan Walters will be fit for Saturday. An MRI scan will show the true extent of the damage. As a result all we can work off are the soundbites from Management and player alike.

In conclusion, we’re all hoping for a speedy recovery and that his removal from the game early might just give him a chance for the big game on Saturday.

COYBIG !

Ronan