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Diabetes, Fitness, Exercise, Physio, Dietary, Dublin 6, Rathmines

The Personal Health Diabetes Programme

Everybody is scared at the start when it comes to embarking on a new journey! The Personal Health Diabetes programme is no different. We thought we were gentle, approachable, understanding and compassionate people!! But what we didn’t consider was that people with Type 2 Diabetes are petrified about making small changes in their lifestyle. Most participants have waited for years before contemplating and finally making some small changes. But they are all delighted once they start and most comment that they wish it happened sooner.

Guilt and Stigma

When we have got to know our participants after a few weeks, often people have mentioned carrying a guilt and stigma with them for developing a condition like Type 2 Diabetes. The condition is lifestyle related, so they feel they have let themselves down in some way. The reality here is that feelings of guilt and stigma are futile. What is important is to take action now and make small but attainable changes to your lifestyle. Former Chair of International Diabetes Federation, Dr Tony O’Sullivan has visited us here to assess the Personal Health Diabetes programme and was impressed, commenting  ‘This programme is suitable for anyone living with diabetes and will really contribute to better control of the condition’.

Sociable and Friendly

Our participants are a lovely sociable gang. 

Diabetes, Health, Fitness, Exercise, Dublin 6, Rathmines

They meet regularly on Tuesday afternoons in clinic and despite the chats and giggles, they get their work done. The fitness levels, size and shape differs from person to person but all are accommodated. The one non negotiable is that they do some good honest work, ending up a little sweaty and breathless (don’t worry nobody crawls out the door!).

What does Type 2 Diabetes programme involve?

Mark Hynes (Chartered Physiotherapist) is running the Type 2 Diabetes programme along with our Dietitian Caoimhe O’Leary. They are doing a brilliant job! 

Dietary, Dietitian, Diabetes          Diabetes, Fitness, Exercise, Physio, Dietary, Dublin 6, Rathmines

The programme involves turning up on Tuesday afternoons at 5pm. Once an initial screening is complete the client is cleared for progress and the fun begins. The exercise classes (4 per month) last approximately 40 minutes in total. Caoimhe also runs a monthly workshop discussing practical and non sacrificial changes to enable healthy eating.

What are the benefits?

Some people choose to test their progress every few months and this has given participants great feedback.  Some see changes in blood sugar levels. Others experience weight loss. Most improve on strength scores and stability. Others feel steadier on their feet and more confident. Most describe greater energy levels. Crucially, as healthcare professionals we see a group reducing the risks associated with the condition. It is a hugely rewarding experience for all concerned.

What do I wear, what do I do, what happens in general??

People tend to arrive a few minutes beforehand in comfortable, exercise clothing. For those arriving from work , there are clean and spacious changing rooms with showers and storage. During each class there is a warm up , some strength training, balance and co-ordination tasks, some short sharp bursts of activity (High Intensity Intervals), some stretching and functional movements, and plenty of advice about pacing yourself. Turn up people! You’ll be glad you did!

Running, Prehab, Physiotherapy, Hip, Knee

Top 10 tips for Runners

Get Started Today to Enjoy a Summer on the Move

Have a Plan:

Whether your aim is to run your local park run every Saturday or to make the Olympics in two year’s time you need to have a plan. There are two options: You can go online to get a generic plan based on achieving a set distance in a target time. Many runners have used them to good effect. The only problem is they might be too advanced or too easy for your running ability. The second option is to get a qualified coach who will tailor a programme to your needs and ability. It is important to have goals with these plans and they range from weekly goals (running 3 times a week) to yearly goals (running  5K in under 20 minutes).

Running gear:

Fail to prepare, prepare to fail. This is where so many new runners fall down. The most important piece of equipment is the shoes and it should be first on your list to buy. Nowadays if you go into any sports shop in the country they will do a gait analysis on you to see which shoes would suit you. They video you while running on a treadmill for a few minutes and then the footage is played back in a Freeze by Freeze frame if necessary to assess your foot plant, stride and running pattern. This information can then be used to find the best shoe for you. Also to consider when buying shoes is the terrain you will be running on (Grass, Road, Trails or track).

While hitting the road you will need heavier shoes with more support. While on the track you would be looking for light shoes with little support. The socks are just as crucial as the shoes as you need running specific socks due to the extra padding across the ball of the foot, the toes and heel area. There’s also usually padding or a tighter area through the arch to allow the shoe to fit more closely and add better arch support. Now on to the shorts and T-shirts which is the uniform of all runners around the world. These need to be lightweight, breathable and sweat-wicking. As we live in Ireland it rains or is extremely windy most of the time. So running jackets, base layers and running tights can be your friends in the constant battle against the weather.

Start where your fitness level is:

If you haven’t ran in years or done any cardiovascular exercises you cannot expect to go out and run 30 minutes straight without needing a rest. To get around this start off by alternating running with walking throughout the run (a minute of walking followed by a minute of running). Another way is to just take short breaks when you need it on the run. So if you are starting off, start with the run/walk method – go slowly and don’t run more than 3 times a week. This way you’ll gradually build your pace and distance and prevent injury.

Always warm up, cool down and stretch:

Before every run you should do some dynamic stretches such as rolling your shoulders back, hip circles, lunges and squats. The dynamic stretch should be followed by five minutes of a slow jog. The warm up and dynamic stretches are done to get every muscle in the body ready for the run and to prevent injury. After you run jog slowly for 5 minutes and finish with some static stretching which you hold for 30 seconds (Quad, Hamstring and Calf stretch).

Running, Stretching, Physio, Physiotherapy

10 percent rule:

As you start progressing on with your running and feeling good, it is important not to over do it. That is why there is a 10 percent rule where you are not meant to increase your weekly training mileage by more than 10 percent per week. People who increase their weekly mileage too quickly get injured. The only exception to the 10 percent rule is if you are starting at a single-digit weekly mileage after a layoff, you can add more than 10 percent per week until you’re close to your normal training load.

The Conversation Rule:

Running is not all about going as fast as you can all the time. Especially on easy runs you should be able to have a full conversation with the person you are running with. People whose heart rate and breathing rates were within their target aerobic zones were found to be able to hold full conversations. Those who couldn’t were running faster than their target aerobic zone. The exceptions to the conversation rule are during hard runs, speedwork or races.

The Hard / Easy day rule:

It states to take one easy day after every hard day of training. An easy day is defined as a short run, slow run, a cross training day or no exercise at all. A hard day is defined as a long run, tempo run or speed workout. Apply The hard/easy day rule to your monthly and yearly training plans by treating yourself to one easy week each month and one easy month each year. The exception to this rule is after the most tiring long runs or speed workouts especially if you are older. You should wait for two or three days before your next hard workout.

Don’t delay refuelling after runs:

Making sure you refuel properly after a run is probably more important than the run itself.  Especially if you have done a fast run. Your post run meal is very important because it will aid recovery.  It is recommended that the post run meal contains carbohydrates for energy replacement and a good source of protein for muscle repair as soon as possible. After a run it is important to have that post run meal within the hour of running. For quick energy before having the post run meal have a banana while cooling down and doing your stretches. As it is quick and easy to eat.

Listen to your body:

If something hurts for two days in a row take days off. Two days of pain may be signalling the beginning of an injury. If the pain continues for over a week even with rest days it is probably time to go see your doctor. It’s the same if your body is feeling tired, there is nothing wrong with taking a day or two off to let the body recover from the exertions of exercise. Even if you have to take a week off from running it is not going to have a big impact on your fitness level.

Track every run so you can see your progress and make notes about your workouts:

Apps like Strava and MapMyRun use GPS to automatically store your route, distance, calories burned and your pace so you’ll watch yourself run further and faster over time. These apps also allow you to enter notes about each run so you can see patterns like that the first mile I always feel terrible (going too fast at the start) or you run faster when go first thing in the morning or that you get a pain in your right leg after 3 miles. The apps are also good because you can set up groups with your friends and challenge each other to see who has the most miles in a week .So this adds some healthy competition.

Exercise, Health, Brain, Fitness, Rathmines, Physio

Exercise to keep your Brain calm

Exercise can help your brain slow down….Which is a really good thing!

The quality of blood flowing to and through the brain is affected by exercise. Is your head in a tizzy?? Exercise can actually slow down the speed with which neurons fire in the brain.

This is a good thing! We all need to slow down a bit. Most people reluctantly enjoyed the recent ‘snow holiday’ as we were forced to switch off and relax for a couple of days. Exercise can have a similarly calming effect. When we unplug devices, meditate or walk by the sea, our brain naturally produces good ingredients. Exercise similarly produces a fertile soil for the brain.

Exercise. Brain

Benefits for the Brain

Exercise will stimulate your memory, situated in the hippocampus area. Your capacity to concentrate will improve. It will reduce your mental stress levels due to effective management of the stress hormone – cortisol. In the same way exercise helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, it also reduces the risk of any cognitive decline – such as dementia or Alzheimer’s.

How?

Everybody talks about the physical benefits of exercise. The word cardiovascular is synonymous with fitness and heart health. Neurovascular is far less commonly used but is equal in importance when we consider exercise.

Neurovascular applies specifically to the blood flow in the brain. When we exercise we oxygenate the brain’s blood vessels with healthy red blood cells. With greater oxygen to the brain we are calmer, more alert, less impulsive and generally better decision makers. This is so valuable in the modern day pressures of work/life/family demands.

Toothpaste for ‘Brain Plaque’

When I wash my teeth in the mornings I put toothpaste on the brush and fire away. The brushing motion along with the toothpaste itself combats the buildup of plaque on our teeth. The brain produces plaque as we get older too. One of the best ways to replicate the toothpaste analogy for our brain is to exercise. The healthy blood flow derived from exercise can help combat the growth of brain plaque. One of the other most important ways to reduce growth of plaque in the brain is to be sociable! And laughter produces feel good hormones too!

So, get out and meet some new people, or connect with an old friend! Go for a walk and have some fun. You are doing yourself and your brain a big favour.

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

Take control of your IBS don’t let it control you – By Caoimhe Mc Donald

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

“Take control of your IBS don’t let it control you”   

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic and relapsing bowel disorder. It affects up to 20% of adults and adolescents as well as children. It is 1.5 times more common in women than in men.  Symptoms include:

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

  • abdominal pain
  • bloating
  • constipation
  • diarrhoea
  • flatulence
  • poor appetite
  • indigestion

It is important to note that many conditions have symptoms that can mimic IBS. Inflammatory bowel disease, coeliac disease and microscopic colitis are a few. It is important that the diagnosis of IBS has been carried out, coeliac disease has been ruled-out and alarm features are absent.

Many people have had symptoms of IBS all their lives and done nothing about it. It is so often put down to having “a sensitive tummy”. As a Dietitian, I would estimate 60 – 70% of my patients suffer with IBS. It is very common for people to come to a dietitian for a different reason and drop it into conversation when discussing their diet. People wonder how it has become so much more common these days. However, when asked about their family history many report one or both of their parents have avoided a food for years as it “doesn’t agree with them”. 

Irritable Bowel, Dietitian, Rathmines

The truth is, more people feel comfortable discussing their digestive health and doing something about it. People live busy lives that can often be stressful and many are now more conscious of their diet and looking after their health. I have seen patients with such severe symptoms it has a huge impact on their quality of life. They are unable to attend work, they fear getting public transport, avoid social activities or not sleeping at night as a result. Why live with something like this when symptoms can be managed effectively?

Multifactorial

The exact cause of IBS is not known and it is thought to be multifactorial. Suggested causes may be; a previous gastrointestinal infection, prolonged antibiotic use, stress, medication, alcohol, poor diet and lifestyle factors. Two thirds of IBS patients perceive their symptoms are related to food. Symptoms can come and go and may be exacerbated in stressful situations which can make it difficult to identify the exact triggers.

So how do people go about managing their symptoms of IBS?

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

  • Medical management using anti-diarrhoeals, anti-spasmodics, laxatives or low dose antidepressants
  • Self-help – 7% treat themselves with no medical supervision
  • Herbal remedies
  • Psychological guidance
  • Probiotics
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Dietary guidance

Diet assessment and adjustment by a qualified dietitian is so important in the management of IBS. Many patients prefer dietary management rather than a reliance on medication. As a dietitian specialising in digestive health, it is very rewarding to see a patients’ symptoms improve. With guidance on diet, meal pattern, lifestyle factors and stress management, people will notice improvements. Some may immediately feel better after increasing fibre in the diet, increasing fluid and introducing exercise. Others may find eliminating certain foods beneficial or the use of a probiotic.

FODMAP Diet

There is a growing interest in restriction of short chain fermentable carbohydrates called FODMAPs (fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, mono-saccharides and polyols….a mouthful I know!) for IBS management. The low FODMAP diet is an exclusion diet specifically for patients with IBS which has been supported by 30 clinical studies. Research has shown that limiting these foods (high in FODMAPS) can alleviate the symptoms associated with IBS.  The low FODMAP diet should be done under the supervision of a dietitian as exclusion diets are at risk of nutritional inadequacy.

If you feel you could benefit from seeing a dietitian in relation to digestive health or any other dietary issue contact Caoimhe McDonald at Personal Health. Caoimhe has worked with patients with IBS for years and can help you identify the triggers for your IBS. Caoimhe will provide meal suggestions, recipes and shopping lists to make sure your diet is still balanced and you are getting all the nutrients you need.

In Conclusion, diet is not always the cause. It can be just one contributing factor to IBS. For many, stress management may be the best solution. Contact the Personal Health team to make an appointment with Consultant Dietitian Caoimhe McDonald or Psychotherapist Susan Duffy on 01 4964002.

Football, Physio, sport, Physiotherapy, Fitness

Will Jonathan Walters be fit for Saturday ? by Ronan Fallon

Well is he going to be fit to continue?

Last night’s match in Paris saw the boys in green put in a great performance on the European stage. It’s fair to say that we could have easily taken all three points. Unfortunately, this result did have an impact on Jonathan Walters.

It is well known that he has been struggling with an Achilles tendon problem for the last few weeks. The Achilles tendon is the common tendon from the calf muscles into the heel bone.
It is a notoriously tricky problem for anyone from an international footballer to a mid-week 5-a-side social footballer or tag rugby player. As such, it was not a good sign that Jonathan Walters reported last night that he was struggling with this issue from the very first minute!

Achilles tendon
As you can see from the image, pretty much all activity on the football pitch requires load to go from the calf muscle and through your Achilles tendon. This allows the athlete to propel forward to run & jump.

 

MANAGEMENT

Chartered Physiotherapy Dublin 6

Decisions Decisions…..

There is no doubt that the Irish medical team are using all of the resources at their disposal in an effort to get Jonathan fit for Saturday. This is a very quick turnaround for an injured achilles such as this one.
I suspect that they will be using a battery of treatments including anti-inflammatories, Icing, Soft tissue for the calf muscles and most importantly rest.
The crucial component in this management strategy is controlling loading. Thai is the weight that he takes through that inflamed tendon. He should be on crutches for 48 hours. This would allow the Achilles to recover without the stress of his bodyweight on every step.

Medical Team

This is a tricky conundrum for the medical team today. How long can they afford to rest Jonathan from team training in preparation for the Belgium match? Martin O’Neill and his team will have  already discussed this and may have even made a decision on ruling him out.
It’s very difficult to see how Jonathan Walters will be fit for Saturday. An MRI scan will show the true extent of the damage. As a result all we can work off are the soundbites from Management and player alike.

In conclusion, we’re all hoping for a speedy recovery and that his removal from the game early might just give him a chance for the big game on Saturday.

COYBIG !

Ronan

Mobility, Flexibility, fitness, movement, health

The Pursuit of Flexibility

As the years go by, the pursuit of flexibility can be a wistful bygone goal. In reality we stiffen up a fair bit as time flies. So, what seemed to be regular flexible movement at one stage, now seems difficult to attain. Why do I groan all of a sudden when I’m standing up from a chair ???

Let’s be kind to ourselves here – mobility and flexibility are often impossible due to our lifestyle demands. Similarly, if we do find some free time, is stretching a priority? It seems so boring… Perhaps not?

Well, there is a lot more to flexibility than static muscle stretching…. A lot more!

And best of all, it can genuinely provide relief, positively affecting your mood.

 

Be kind to each other

Many components affect our flexibility including:

Joint Capsule
Muscle
Ligaments
Tendons
Nerves

I am going to focus on joint stiffness in the thoracic (mid) spine as this is a common presentation across office workers. It is also equally common in multiple sports including cycling, rowing, boxing, wrestling and hockey.  Here is why…

The thoracic spine is the area of our spine located between your neck and low back. Thoracic mobility is important for optimal movement. The mobility of spinal joints and their surrounding capsules adapt depending on the activities performed. Multiple sports require the athlete to move with their arms positioned in front of their body, this positional demands often result in the shoulders sitting forward and a round upper back consequently increasing the risk of developing stiffness in this area.

As the mobility of the thoracic spine affects the function of the shoulders, neck and low back, it is strongly recommended to spend time ensuring your thoracic mobility is being maintained. It is all about balance.

IMG_2129
The more time you spend sitting at your desk, or training, then the more time you need to invest in maintaining your mobility and flexibility. To prevent long-term changes the idea is to position your body in the opposite positions from what you train or work in. For most people this will involve mobilising your upper back in extension and in combined extension and rotation. In other words, straightening your spine.

Over the past years I have found the following thoracic mobility exercises to be highly effective in maintaining and restoring thoracic movement:

1.Thoracic extension on foam roller:

Stretches the pectoral muscles and forces extension in the upper back. Ensure your low back is flattened on the roller for most efficiency. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 2-3 times. You can alter the position of your arms between 90 degrees and 120 degrees to bias different areas of your upper back. See image below.

IMG_3255 (1)

 

2. Segmental flexion and extension over the foam roller:

Place fingers on temples to promote thoracic extension. Position the foam roller horizontally and roll along your upper back. Stop at the segments which feel more uncomfortable and stiff. To bias the mobility at these segments, slowly extend over the roller towards the ground. Support your lower back whilst doing this by tucking your bum in. See pictures below as the athlete moves from thoracic flexion into segmental extension.

IMG_3256 IMG_3257

 

 

 

 

3. Bows and Arrows:

Position yourself in side-lying so that shoulders and hips are in line. Bend your knees so that your hips and knees are in line (this offloads your low back ensuring the movement is coming form your upper back). Outstretch both arms. Reach the top hand past the bottom hand and then pull backwards as though drawing the arrow on a bow. In this drawing back motion, aim to have the top shoulder facing up towards the ceiling. This is a slow and controlled movement and aim for 10 repetitions 2-3 times on each side. See the images below.

IMG_3258

IMG_3259

4. Shaking it all out:

Finally, if all else fails….Try loosely and gently relaxing your stomach, if you have ‘a belly’ (everybody does by the way) let it real and hang over your belt. Then gently allow some light  shaking through all the main joints, neck, shoulder, spine, hips, knees, ankles and feet. Just like the way Diego Maradona used to warm up for football games…..

 

 

Tag a friend if you feel this article is relevant to them, or that co-worker who constantly complain of upper back stiffness! If you have any further questions or queries regarding thoracic mobility or wish to purchase a foam roller contact us at Personal Health on 01 4964002 or email info@personalhealth.ie.

Physio, Golf, Tennis, Physiotherapy, Fitness, Exercise

Tennis Elbow, Golfers Elbow or both – the dreaded Country club!!

Tennis Elbow, Golfers Elbow or both – the dreaded Country club!! 

country club

 

I’m regularly asked about both Golfers & Tennis elbow in the clinic. Generally they are a large portion of the non-contact elbow injuries that patients develop. Commonly, it’s a term that people have heard of but are not quite sure what it actually is! Golf or tennis may not be on your list of hobbies to be struck down!

A tennis elbow is an irritation of the tendon on the outside or lateral part of the elbow whilst a golfer’s elbow is an irritation of the tendon on the inside or medial part of the elbow.

If you are unlucky enough to develop both, you become a member of the “Country Club!”

 

Golfers-vs-Tennis-Elbow

 

Basically, the majority of the muscles in our forearms anchor to either the inside or outside of the elbow via a shared tendon. When we overload these tendons from things such as hitting 200 golf balls off a rubber mat or deciding to tackle painting the house in one swoop, we can cause a painful episode in these tendons.

It’s a very common problem. I always like to take people through the anatomy of the issue. Understanding is the key to settling this problem down. We are fortunate to have some state  of the art anatomy tools to facilitate this in the Personal Health clinic.

 

image_Blue_elbow-pain

 

Acute or Long-Standing Issue

The next question is whether it is an acute flare up or a long standing grumbling issue? This largely dictates the management and treatment. Conservative management with appropriate exercise, soft tissue work and de-loading of the tendon resolve this issue in the majority of cases. Surgery and injections are thankfully relatively rare.

 

 

 

Call us to find out more.

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.persoanlhealth.ie

Diet, Nutrition, weight, dietitian, dublin 6

Diet, Nutrition…. what is all the fuss about?

Diet, Nutrition…. what is all the fuss about?

what is nutrition

 

When giving presentations I often ask my audience “why do you think diet is so important?”.

Various responses are given; “to lose weight”, “prevent heart problems”,“ prevent diabetes” which are all true but they are long term effects of good nutrition. It is amazing to see how few people think about the short term effects of eating a healthy balanced diet.

We are living busy lives trying to juggle family life, work, friends, exercise to say nothing of diet. Few people have time to sit down and think about their diet and how it affects them.

balanced diet

 

Eating a balanced diet in addition to having regular meals throughout the day can:

  • Boost your energy levels
  • Prevent sugar cravings
  • Protect your digestive health
  • Stop that sluggish feeling after a heavy meal
  • Prevent low mood
  • Boost your immune system
  • Improve your concentration levels
  • Encourage self esteem

Reduce risk

In addition to the short term effects of good nutrition, in the long run a healthy diet can reduce your risk of developing:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Cancer
  • Stroke
  • Osteoporosis
  • Anaemia
  • Diverticulitis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome

In fact, many illnesses can be as a result of our genes which we can do nothing about. However, we are in control of modifiable risk factors such as our diet and physical activity and can reduce the risk of various diseases.

How can Personal Health help you to achieve a healthy diet?

Finally, our Consultant Dietitian can assist you and help you to improve your diet by;

  • identifying your specific nutritional needs
  • providing dietary and lifestyle advice tailored to your needs
  • coupled with developing tailored resources such as recipes, meal plans, shopping lists to help you to achieve your goals too
  • providing encouragement and motivation in a supportive, non-judgemental environment.

Diet teamCall us to find out more.

Phone 01 496 4002                                                                      

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.personalhealth.ie

Health, Physio, Physiotherapy, fitness, exercise

Invest In Your Health Now or Pay For Your Health Later….

Invest In Your Health Now or Pay For Your Health Later……..

Nobody can control the uncontrollable. Age only accumulates and the battle scars of a life in progress mount up, imposing imitations to ambulation and to motivation. We are often at the mercy of external pressures on our health, which can feel all-consuming and relentless; work, family, finance, etc.  It never ends…life is hard work!

But it is fun too! And we can make efforts to control the controllable which in turn makes everything else much more manageable.

We should start with ourselves as individuals. Health is something that we can and must cherish. We can and should take better care of ourselves. This starts with wanting to be as healthy as you can be and incorporating routine into your life.The benefits of feeling fit and healthy have positive effects on all facets of our lives. Mens sana in corpore sano  (a healthy mind in a healthy body) is not just a saying. It’s very true.

 

Healthy mind

 

 

What is stopping you? 

• Time – Time waits for no one. But there is plenty of it in the week to make a difference. At Personal Health we have a range of classes for the time pressed at times that work for you.

• Knowledge – No man is an island. Nobody knows everything but as a collective community of health professionals the Personal Health team is ready, willing and able to guide you and advise you on all aspects of your health.

• Confidence – You have our vote! We are a team of health professionals who espouse the lifestyle we promote. We are here to facilitate your needs and to guide and advise you on all aspects of your health.

• Cost – Your health is your wealth. Our Medically Led Fitness classes are great value and the perfect way to join our community.

 

 

change

 

 

There are always barriers to changing lifestyle habits. Change is hard and requires focus and support. The Personal Health team prides itself on looking after you. Everyone is different but we all want to be as fit and healthy as we can be.

We take your health personally!

Call us to find out more.

 

 

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.personalhealth.ie

Ronan Fallon Physiotherapist Dublin 6

Muscle Strains and Timeframes – ‘When will I recover?’

Muscle strains and injuries are usually caused by a shearing effect such as a contact injury or a strain. The muscle fibres and their surrounding tiny blood vessels rupture hence the pain.
The healing process for the human body is incredible – the repair cycle kicks in within hours.

It is a complicated physiological process but in a nutshell you’re looking at a cycle of 21 days until your muscle is getting close to where it used to be prior to injury. Due to this process, it is very important to be patient and listen to your body.

 

The Trap 
The classic trap is that you begin to feel ok and pain free by day 7-10 and think “I’m good to train again tonight”. Unfortunately, this is a recipe for a re-injury and starting the whole process all over again.

 

Management 
Therefore, correct management of muscle strains and injuries is very important to prevent re-injury and chronic repetitive problems. In these cases the majority of clients just need a helping hand to guide the process from acute management through to a short rehabilitation/strengthening  programme.

 

Return 

The key component for the majority of clients is getting back to regular routines, sporting/exercise etc. in a responsible and time efficient manner.

 

 

IMG_2960

 

How can Personal Health make the difference for you….?

Use Our App!

  • Our Personal Health App uses rehabilitation videos filmed in line with best practice in e-learning
  • no more guesswork around your technique
  • your doctor/physio can prescribe from a library of over 1000 exercises ranging from basic to dynamic agility based rehabilitation
  • track your progress with interactive rating scales & charts
  • facilitates regular contact with your doctor/physio as we distance monitor your progress

 

Thanks for taking the time to read this

Ronan Fallon, Director of Physiotherapy