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Women’s Health Physiotherapy at Personal Health

Women’s Health Physiotherapy

At Personal Health Physiotherapy  we go one step further and give a little extra care for our ladies. We provide solutions and management programmes for the main problems women deal with in their life-time. Whether it is pregnancy related concerns, incontinence issues or care after Breast Cancer, our Women’s Health Specialist physiotherapist Mary Kate Ryan has the experience and knowledge to help you all.

womens-health

Pregnancy issues

Experiencing the joy of giving birth is a miraculous event. It can however physically damage and injure your body if you do not prepare your body through this life changing event. Back pain, sciatica, neck pain, headaches, tingling in the hands, incontinence, pelvic pain are all common conditions that you should not have to experience.

Our physiotherapists will provide solutions and management programs to protect you body from potential permanent injuries by:

  • Assessing the threats in your body that will cause you harm
  • Pre-natal and Post-natal management programs
  • Guided exercises to strengthen you pelvic floor to help incontinence and sexual discomfort

Mary Kate will be with you every step of the way, ensuring you and your child
have the safest delivery possible, and ensuring your health, body, and lifestyle are maintained throughout pregnancy. This is all done in a safe, confidential and professional environment.

womens-health1

Incontinence issues

Mary Kate has the skills and knowledge to combat your incontinence issues. With over 30% of females suffering from a weak bladder or bowel, our goal is to markedly reduce this problem you are faced with.

Wouldn’t it feel fantastic to gain control of your pelvic floor so that you don’t have to worry about accidents with your bladder or bowel? So many females after attending Personal Health have successfully gained control over their incontinence issues, and gained their lifestyles back! We can help whether you suffer from:

  • Bladder and bowel incontinence
  • Stress incontinence
  • Urge incontinence
  • Mixed incontinence
  • Prolapses
  • Over active bladder symptoms
  • Pregnancy related incontinence

You will expect your care to be done in a safe, confidential and professional environment.

 

womens-health2

 

Post Breast Cancer Care

 

Chartered Physiotherapists specialising in Breast Cancer recovery

Pink Ribbon at Personal Health

At Personal Health, the Pink Ribbon Programme is led by experienced physiotherapists and breast cancer exercise specialists, Mary-Kate Ryan and Deirdre Ryan.

The Pink Ribbon Programme will help stretch and strengthen the shoulders, chest, back, and abdominal muscles, allowing you to regain full range of motion to those areas affected by breast cancer surgery while also focusing on core stability to give your body a strong foundation on which to move.  It supports the physical and emotional recovery from breast cancer surgery and promotes a positive body image.

Benefits of the Pink Ribbon Programme:

  • Regain Strength and Mobility in the Affected Arm and Shoulder
  • Promotes Lymphatic Drainage, helping to prevent lymphedema
  • Improves Functional Ability and Quality of life
  • Decreases Stress and Anxiety
  • Improves Exercise tolerance
  • Alleviates Pain & Swelling
  • Assists in restoring posture
  • Enhances physical and mental well-being

The Pink Ribbon consists of a six-week gentle and staged exercise programme consisting of a 30-minute class twice a week along with an initial consultation. A book and band are included with the course to ensure progress continues between the classes.

For more information on our Women’s Health Care Services contact us on 01 4964002 or info@personalhealth.ie

Pelvic Girdle Pain During Pregnancy – Women’s Health Physiotherapy

Pelvic Girdle Pain During Pregnancy -Women’s Health Physiotherapy

What is it?

Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) is a collection of uncomfortable symptoms caused by a stiffness of your pelvic joints or the joints moving unevenly at either the back or front of your pelvis. 

It is not harmful to your baby, but it can cause severe pain around your pelvic area and make it difficult for you to get around.

Around 20% of women suffer from Pelvic girdle pain.

Different women have different symptoms, and PGP is worse for some women than others.

Symptoms can include:

  • Pain over the pubic bone at the front in the center
  • Pain across one or both sides of your lower back
  • Pain in the area between your vagina and anus (perineum)
  • Pain in your buttocks.

Pain can also radiate to your thighs, and some women feel or hear a clicking or grinding in the pelvic area.

          

   

The pain can be most noticeable when you are:

  • Turning in Bed
  • Going upstairs
  • Walking
  • Standing on one leg (e.g. getting dressed)
  • Getting out of car
  • Standing up

What Causes PGP:

Sometimes there is no obvious explanation for the cause of PGP.

Usually, there is a combination of factors causing PGP.

Relaxin: During pregnancy, the placenta produces a hormone called relaxin, which softens your ligaments to loosen up your joints. Relaxin is very important as by loosening the joints it allows your baby to pass through more easily during childbirth however it can lead to the pelvic girdle becoming less stable and therefore painful during pregnancy.

Occasionally the position of the baby may also produce symptoms related to PGP.

With PGP the degree of discomfort you are feeling may vary from being intermittent and irritating to being very wearing and upsetting.

  

Treatment

Physiotherapy: Advice, Education, Exercises and Manual techniques can help!

The sooner it is identified and assessed the better it can be managed which may help to speed up your recovery, reducing the impact of PGP on your life.

If you have symptoms that do not improve within a week or two, or interfere with your normal day-to-day life, you may have PGP and should ask for help from your midwife, GP, physiotherapist or other health carer.

Tips:

  • Continue to be as active as your can within your pain limits, and avoid activities that make your pain worse.
  • Ensure your back is well supported while you sit down. This can be achieved by placing a towel between the curve of your back and the chair.
  • Wear flat, supportive shoes and avoid standing for long periods.
  • Get help with household chores from friends, partner, and family.
  • Rest when you can.
  • Sit down to get dressed-e.g. Don’t stand on one leg when putting on jeans.
  • Try and make sure any weight you carry is evenly distributed- this means no shoulder bags, and try nit to left your toddler up onto your hip.
  • Be careful and take your time doing any activities that may put strain on your pelvis i.e. getting out of a car- keep your knees together and squeeze your buttocks.
  • Sleep with a pillow between your legs
  • Squeeze your buttocks and keep your knees together when turning in bed.
  • Take the stairs one at a time, leading with the less painful leg.

Avoid:

  • Standing on one leg
  • Bending and twisting to lift
  • Carrying a baby on one hip
  • Crossing your legs
  • Sitting on the floor or in a twisted position
  • Sitting or standing for long periods
  • Lifting or pushing heavy objects such as shopping bags, supermarket trolley.
  • Carrying anything in one hand (try using a small back pack).

Physiotherapy

It is important if you pain is not manageable with general advise to book into a physiotherapist. Treatment includes:

  • Assessment
  • Exercises to specifically retrain and strengthen stomach, back, pelvic floor and hip muscles
  • Manual therapy to ensure your spinal, pelvic and hip joints are moving normally or to correct their movement.
  • Acupuncture
  • Exercises in water.
  • Provision of equipment e.g. pelvic girdle support belts, crutches

To Book an appointment with our Women’s Health Physiotherapist Mary-Kate call Personal Health at 01 4964002 or email info@personalhealth.ie.

The Role of the Brain in relation to Pain

Pain perception

The Complex Homunculus

homonculus1

 

Brain Map

There is a representation or map of every body part in the brain. Consider this the ‘virtual representation’. The correct term for this representation is a homunculus. These virtual bodies inform us of what our ‘actual’ bodies are doing in space.

Above are 2 homonculi, 1 representing the skin and the other representing movement. In the sensory homunculus, you will notice the areas in the brain devoted to the lips, hands and face are larger. This indicates that areas which require better sensation have a larger representation. The same is said for the motor homunculus as areas which you use more have a bigger representation. Again this is adaptable depending on your line of work, hobbies etc. For example an author will have a bigger representation of their dominant hand due to writing with the hand a lot.

Chartered Physiotherapy

Smudging & the Homunculus

Smudging

Imaging studies reveal that chronic pain results in changes in the virtual representation of the area affected. ‘Smudging’ of the virtual limb so that there no longer is a clear defined outline of the body part is one such change. This can result in an overlapping of neighbouring body parts. I like to compare this to driving in fog. When driving in fog, your vision is compromised. You are no longer sure of what is ahead on the road.You slow down, turn down the music, you may even roll down the window. You become very cautious and hyper-vigilant in an attempt to control the environment.  The brain is similar when unsure of what exactly is happening in an area. It can become very conservative in its management at times causing the neighbouring areas to hurt or areas that didn’t hurt before can start to hurt.

The more chronic the pain is, as in the longer you have been experiencing the pain, then the more advanced changes in the brain have occurred. For example the more difficult that body part will be to use or the more sensitivity you will have in that body part or the neighbouring areas. Ultimately, the physical body mirrors the state of the virtual representation in the brain.

Educated Movement

The great news is that smudging is reversible. Educated movement is excellent in helping to normalise the virtual representations in the brain. Every time you move in a pain-free controlled manner it is positively reinforcing normalisation of smudged representations. Furthermore, it is the understanding why pain occurs and removing the threat of the pain which enables you to move freely. This reason alone is why so much emphasis is placed upon the biology of pain. It is a huge help to understand the science behind this marvellous process. By gifting ourselves with this knowledge, we are allowing ourselves to increase our physical capacity, reduce pain and improve quality of life.

‘Explain Pain’ by Lorimer Moseley and David Butler is a brilliant book which has formed the basis of these blogs. It is written with the aim to enable individuals who experience chronic pain. I would highly recommend it.

Should you require any further information on this topic of pain please do not hesitate to contact me in Personal Health on 01 4964002.

USAIN BOLT – THE RACE FOR OLYMPIC FITNESS!! by Ronan Fallon

USAIN BOLT – THE RACE FOR OLYMPIC FITNESS!!!

Last week in Jamaica, Usain Bolt pulled out of the national finals following a second night of discomfort in his hamstring muscle. The diagnosis is a Grade 1 muscle tear. This is potentially a big problem as he needs to qualify for the Olympic Games on the 22nd of July in London. 

Usain Bolt Running out of Time, Ronan Fallon, Physiotherapy, Personal Health, D6

Will he run out of time??

Firstly, what is a Grade 1 muscle tear? Put simply, muscle injuries are clinically graded on a scale of 1-3 with 1 being the least serious and 3 being a severe rupture.

If you are dealing with an Olympic athlete, he will probably undergo an MRI to confirm what the medical team already know from their clinical examination of the presenting problem. 

Secondly, what happens next? There is a battery of treatments that an Olympic athlete will receive. Usain Bolt has flown to Germany to see a specialist for further treatment. Ultimately, these treatments are designed to speed up the healing process. These can vary depending on all sorts of issues, mainly money! However, Mother Nature’s physiological healing timeframes need to be acknowledged and respected.

Medical team, Usain Bolt, Personal Health,Ronan Fallon, Physiotherapy, Personal Health, D6

 

Muscle is like a Rope!

A reasonable analogy is that the fibres in Muscle tissue are similar to the strands of a rope. Once an injury has occurred, then the amazing human healing cycle begins. This can take weeks to fully return to somewhere close to the pre-injury condition.

Here’s the problem, the Hamstring muscle has to be fully healed and strong before you even attempt to put it through the most severe test which is flat out sprinting. 

Usain Bolt of Jamaica starts in the men's 200 metres heats during the world athletics championships at the Olympic stadium in Berlin, August 18, 2009. REUTERS/Dominic Ebenbichler (GERMANY)Ronan Fallon, Physiotherapy, Personal Health, D6

I am sure that Usain is being managed extremely carefully as the medical and physiotherapy team attempt to combine the tricky task of accelerating healing and loading appropriately in an effort to prepare for the ultimate test on the 22nd of July.

Elite athletes such as Usain Bolt are obviously supreme physical specimens. This generally helps shave a few days of the well-known recovery timeframes. Also, access to medical and physiotherapy services which will be babysitting him 24 hours a day is also a bonus. 

Usain Bolt, Bubble wrap, Personal Health,Ronan Fallon, Physiotherapy, Personal Health, D6

Bearing all this in mind, and considering that he is the fastest man on the planet. I am confident that he will get through the qualification stages even if he is not 100% fit. 

If you are an Olympic athlete, recreational runner or 5-a-side player, all muscle injuries are very well understood. Chartered Physiotherapy will help with grading and managing recovery.

Women's Heath Chartered Physiotherapy

2 Simple Exercises to strengthen your Pelvic Floor – Women’s Health Physiotherapy

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training

Pelvic floor muscles are very important as they:

  • Control the bladder and bowel
  • Support the pelvic organs and thus help prevent prolapse
  • Are important for sexual function
  • Support the growing uterus when pregnant
  • Work with core muscles to support the spine

 

Women's Health

The Supportive ‘Hammock’ of the Pelvic Floor

Where are they?

They attach to the pubic bone at the front and tail bone at the back and to the side of the pelvic walls.
They are the only horizontal muscle in your body and often described as a hammock that supports the pelvic organs.

 

What can weaken the Pelvic floor?
  • Regular straining to empty the bowel
  • Constant coughing
  • Weight of baby and hormones during pregnancy
  • Muscle damage and interventions used during birth
  • Work involving regular heavy lifting
  • Excessive abdominal workouts or over challenging exercise
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Hysterectomy and some pelvic surgery.
Pelvic Floor function at Personal Health, Dublin 6

The Correct Exercise is Vital

 

Pelvic floor muscles cause problems when they are….
  • Weak and not strong enough to lift when you run or sneeze
  • Tight and cannot relax
  • Over powered by excessive tightness in trunk and waist muscles
  • 1 in 3 women experience incontinence after labor due to pelvic floor dysfunction.

 

 

Benefits of Pelvic Floor Exercises:
  • Restoration of vaginal muscle tone and vaginal health
  • Recover from physical stress of childbirth
  • Prevention and treatment of stress urinary incontinence.
  • Strengthen the pelvic floor muscles
  • Increase blood supply and nerve supply to the pelvic region
  • Increases sexual stimulation and feeling

 

2 Simple Exercises to strengthen your Pelvic Floor

It is important for all women before and after birth whether they have a vaginal or cesarean delivery to strengthen their pelvic floor muscles.

1. Long Hold:
Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet supported but apart.
Squeeze and lift around all 3 openings in your pelvic 
floor. These being your back passage vagina and bladder. Like you are 
trying to stop yourself passing wind and urine.
Hold for 6-10 seconds, keep your abdominal, buttock and 
thigh muscles relaxed and continue to breathe 
normally.
Relax for 3 seconds.
Repeat this exercise another 5 times
Repeat 3 times a day.
As your pelvic floor muscles get stronger, practice in 
sitting and standing.
Gradually increase the hold time and number of repetitions until you can do a 10 second hold 10 times.
Remember…Always stop exercising when the muscle fatigues.
2. Quick holds
Tighten the pelvic floor muscles as above but only hold for a second before letting go fully.
Repeat 5 times in a row.
Repeat 3 times a day.
Gradually increase your repetitions until you can do 20 
quick squeezes in a row, it may take a few months to be able to do this.

 

 

How can Personal Health help?

Book an appointment with our Women’s Health Chartered Physiotherapist Mary-Kate Ryan to get a thorough pelvic floor assessment and specifically tailored exercise programme.

Please book an appointment online or Call 01 4964002

Women's Health Physiotherapy Dublin 6

It’s as easy as that!!!!

Cycling, physio, physiotherapist, movement, fitness, health

Summer, Sunshine & Spandex by Tim Ahern, Chartered Physiotherapist

We cyclists call it Lycra and there is a lot of it about lately. Here on Rathgar road we see hundreds of commuters and leisure cyclists pass by our clinic on their way to and from work every morning. This is great to see. All sorts of people are cycling now on all sorts of machines. Some new, some old and many ill-fitting.

IMG_1189

New to Cycling?

For those of you who are new to cycling and training for that first triathlon, charity cycle or are just beginning in the sport, bike fit is important. The usual hotspots of discomfort for the beginner include the lower back and the back-side. This is a normal and temporary phenomenon. But often times pain and discomfort in these areas persists. Knee, neck and wrist pain are also common. Therefore having a bike that is comfortable and suitably set-up for your requirements is a must in order to minimise or indeed prevent such injuries. Appropriate bike set-up is key to enjoying injury free cycling and this becomes more pertinent as time in the saddle increases. Despite the myriad of different bike designs and new technologies available, a bicycle remains a bicycle.

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Rider and bike have 5 contact points, both hands, both feet and the one bottom! The bike is a symmetrical machine. Many of us are not. Parameters such as handlebar reach, handlebar type and angle, the degree of knee flexion in pedal stroke, shoe cleat position and saddle position are the main interfaces between the rider and the bike. That results in a huge number of possible position permutations. Many people are now measured and fitted for their bikes before they purchase them. This is very useful. As with clothes, not everyone can buy “off the peg”.

MLF cycling

 

Assessment

Personal Health offer an individualised assessment of the individual’s anatomy and injury history. We take into account the type, the intensity and the volume of cycling of each client. We don’t try to make radical changes to set-up or position, rather we look at making micro adjustments to the bike set-up. This may stave off injury and reduce discomfort based on our physical assessment of the body first, and then the bike.

Based on our findings, we will provide a relevant exercise programme for the body. This is a bespoke service and some clients require more focus on the physical and others require more attention on the bike set-up. Most often though, it is a combination of the two.

Tim Ahern is a Chartered Physiotherapist, an Exercise Physiologist, and a hugely passionate cyclist. He is an integral part of Personal Health, providing a valuable link between our clinical expertise and the practical aspects of exercise prescription. 

Mobility, Flexibility, fitness, movement, health

The Pursuit of Flexibility

As the years go by, the pursuit of flexibility can be a wistful bygone goal. In reality we stiffen up a fair bit as time flies. So, what seemed to be regular flexible movement at one stage, now seems difficult to attain. Why do I groan all of a sudden when I’m standing up from a chair ???

Let’s be kind to ourselves here – mobility and flexibility are often impossible due to our lifestyle demands. Similarly, if we do find some free time, is stretching a priority? It seems so boring… Perhaps not?

Well, there is a lot more to flexibility than static muscle stretching…. A lot more!

And best of all, it can genuinely provide relief, positively affecting your mood.

 

Be kind to each other

Many components affect our flexibility including:

Joint Capsule
Muscle
Ligaments
Tendons
Nerves

I am going to focus on joint stiffness in the thoracic (mid) spine as this is a common presentation across office workers. It is also equally common in multiple sports including cycling, rowing, boxing, wrestling and hockey.  Here is why…

The thoracic spine is the area of our spine located between your neck and low back. Thoracic mobility is important for optimal movement. The mobility of spinal joints and their surrounding capsules adapt depending on the activities performed. Multiple sports require the athlete to move with their arms positioned in front of their body, this positional demands often result in the shoulders sitting forward and a round upper back consequently increasing the risk of developing stiffness in this area.

As the mobility of the thoracic spine affects the function of the shoulders, neck and low back, it is strongly recommended to spend time ensuring your thoracic mobility is being maintained. It is all about balance.

IMG_2129
The more time you spend sitting at your desk, or training, then the more time you need to invest in maintaining your mobility and flexibility. To prevent long-term changes the idea is to position your body in the opposite positions from what you train or work in. For most people this will involve mobilising your upper back in extension and in combined extension and rotation. In other words, straightening your spine.

Over the past years I have found the following thoracic mobility exercises to be highly effective in maintaining and restoring thoracic movement:

1.Thoracic extension on foam roller:

Stretches the pectoral muscles and forces extension in the upper back. Ensure your low back is flattened on the roller for most efficiency. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 2-3 times. You can alter the position of your arms between 90 degrees and 120 degrees to bias different areas of your upper back. See image below.

IMG_3255 (1)

 

2. Segmental flexion and extension over the foam roller:

Place fingers on temples to promote thoracic extension. Position the foam roller horizontally and roll along your upper back. Stop at the segments which feel more uncomfortable and stiff. To bias the mobility at these segments, slowly extend over the roller towards the ground. Support your lower back whilst doing this by tucking your bum in. See pictures below as the athlete moves from thoracic flexion into segmental extension.

IMG_3256 IMG_3257

 

 

 

 

3. Bows and Arrows:

Position yourself in side-lying so that shoulders and hips are in line. Bend your knees so that your hips and knees are in line (this offloads your low back ensuring the movement is coming form your upper back). Outstretch both arms. Reach the top hand past the bottom hand and then pull backwards as though drawing the arrow on a bow. In this drawing back motion, aim to have the top shoulder facing up towards the ceiling. This is a slow and controlled movement and aim for 10 repetitions 2-3 times on each side. See the images below.

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4. Shaking it all out:

Finally, if all else fails….Try loosely and gently relaxing your stomach, if you have ‘a belly’ (everybody does by the way) let it real and hang over your belt. Then gently allow some light  shaking through all the main joints, neck, shoulder, spine, hips, knees, ankles and feet. Just like the way Diego Maradona used to warm up for football games…..

 

 

Tag a friend if you feel this article is relevant to them, or that co-worker who constantly complain of upper back stiffness! If you have any further questions or queries regarding thoracic mobility or wish to purchase a foam roller contact us at Personal Health on 01 4964002 or email info@personalhealth.ie.

Physio, Golf, Tennis, Physiotherapy, Fitness, Exercise

Tennis Elbow, Golfers Elbow or both – the dreaded Country club!!

Tennis Elbow, Golfers Elbow or both – the dreaded Country club!! 

country club

 

I’m regularly asked about both Golfers & Tennis elbow in the clinic. Generally they are a large portion of the non-contact elbow injuries that patients develop. Commonly, it’s a term that people have heard of but are not quite sure what it actually is! Golf or tennis may not be on your list of hobbies to be struck down!

A tennis elbow is an irritation of the tendon on the outside or lateral part of the elbow whilst a golfer’s elbow is an irritation of the tendon on the inside or medial part of the elbow.

If you are unlucky enough to develop both, you become a member of the “Country Club!”

 

Golfers-vs-Tennis-Elbow

 

Basically, the majority of the muscles in our forearms anchor to either the inside or outside of the elbow via a shared tendon. When we overload these tendons from things such as hitting 200 golf balls off a rubber mat or deciding to tackle painting the house in one swoop, we can cause a painful episode in these tendons.

It’s a very common problem. I always like to take people through the anatomy of the issue. Understanding is the key to settling this problem down. We are fortunate to have some state  of the art anatomy tools to facilitate this in the Personal Health clinic.

 

image_Blue_elbow-pain

 

Acute or Long-Standing Issue

The next question is whether it is an acute flare up or a long standing grumbling issue? This largely dictates the management and treatment. Conservative management with appropriate exercise, soft tissue work and de-loading of the tendon resolve this issue in the majority of cases. Surgery and injections are thankfully relatively rare.

 

 

 

Call us to find out more.

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.persoanlhealth.ie

Health, Physio, Physiotherapy, fitness, exercise

Invest In Your Health Now or Pay For Your Health Later….

Invest In Your Health Now or Pay For Your Health Later……..

Nobody can control the uncontrollable. Age only accumulates and the battle scars of a life in progress mount up, imposing imitations to ambulation and to motivation. We are often at the mercy of external pressures on our health, which can feel all-consuming and relentless; work, family, finance, etc.  It never ends…life is hard work!

But it is fun too! And we can make efforts to control the controllable which in turn makes everything else much more manageable.

We should start with ourselves as individuals. Health is something that we can and must cherish. We can and should take better care of ourselves. This starts with wanting to be as healthy as you can be and incorporating routine into your life.The benefits of feeling fit and healthy have positive effects on all facets of our lives. Mens sana in corpore sano  (a healthy mind in a healthy body) is not just a saying. It’s very true.

 

Healthy mind

 

 

What is stopping you? 

• Time – Time waits for no one. But there is plenty of it in the week to make a difference. At Personal Health we have a range of classes for the time pressed at times that work for you.

• Knowledge – No man is an island. Nobody knows everything but as a collective community of health professionals the Personal Health team is ready, willing and able to guide you and advise you on all aspects of your health.

• Confidence – You have our vote! We are a team of health professionals who espouse the lifestyle we promote. We are here to facilitate your needs and to guide and advise you on all aspects of your health.

• Cost – Your health is your wealth. Our Medically Led Fitness classes are great value and the perfect way to join our community.

 

 

change

 

 

There are always barriers to changing lifestyle habits. Change is hard and requires focus and support. The Personal Health team prides itself on looking after you. Everyone is different but we all want to be as fit and healthy as we can be.

We take your health personally!

Call us to find out more.

 

 

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.personalhealth.ie

Ronan Fallon Physiotherapist Dublin 6

Muscle Strains and Timeframes – ‘When will I recover?’

Muscle strains and injuries are usually caused by a shearing effect such as a contact injury or a strain. The muscle fibres and their surrounding tiny blood vessels rupture hence the pain.
The healing process for the human body is incredible – the repair cycle kicks in within hours.

It is a complicated physiological process but in a nutshell you’re looking at a cycle of 21 days until your muscle is getting close to where it used to be prior to injury. Due to this process, it is very important to be patient and listen to your body.

 

The Trap 
The classic trap is that you begin to feel ok and pain free by day 7-10 and think “I’m good to train again tonight”. Unfortunately, this is a recipe for a re-injury and starting the whole process all over again.

 

Management 
Therefore, correct management of muscle strains and injuries is very important to prevent re-injury and chronic repetitive problems. In these cases the majority of clients just need a helping hand to guide the process from acute management through to a short rehabilitation/strengthening  programme.

 

Return 

The key component for the majority of clients is getting back to regular routines, sporting/exercise etc. in a responsible and time efficient manner.

 

 

IMG_2960

 

How can Personal Health make the difference for you….?

Use Our App!

  • Our Personal Health App uses rehabilitation videos filmed in line with best practice in e-learning
  • no more guesswork around your technique
  • your doctor/physio can prescribe from a library of over 1000 exercises ranging from basic to dynamic agility based rehabilitation
  • track your progress with interactive rating scales & charts
  • facilitates regular contact with your doctor/physio as we distance monitor your progress

 

Thanks for taking the time to read this

Ronan Fallon, Director of Physiotherapy