Posts

Exercise, Gym, Physio, Tendons

Should I Exercise when injured? Ask the Physiotherapist

Should I Exercise when injured? Ask the Physiotherapist

Should I stay away from the Gym while I get better? Absolutely not!

A lot of our physiotherapy and exercise patients are concerned about abandoning their regular fitness regime, particularly when injured and experiencing pain. Let’s get one thing straight – the days of a physiotherapist suggesting you should avoid activity are long gone. You should most certainly continue turning up at the gym, in fact we’re probably going to push you there! We will simply look at tweaking some of the programme you are working through. While rest is always a good thing for the human body, strength and exercise are a vital component of rehabilitation.

Tendons respond to loading … But not too much!!

Tendon damage is a very frequent issue presenting in clinic at www.personalhealth.ie.

A tendon is where the muscle attaches to bone. If you imagine a juicy steak – the grizzly bits in by the bone are tendons. A juicy muscle belly is rich in blood vessels, which promote healing once our circulation is good. However the tendons (the grizzly bit) have less blood supply and therefore take longer to heal. Tendons do get better, no need for alarm. They are just a bit more complex. They respond to various forms of therapy and rehabilitation – one such approach is increased loading to help the healing process. Just not too much… and correct technique is vital.

Inflammation vs tissue damage

Tendons can be overworked or overloaded and as a result they become inflamed. There may not be actual tissue damage such as a partial tear/rupture. However, the inflammation caused by excessive loading can be a real irritation.

Running on a dodgy ankle

Think about some long distance running on a dodgy ankle. This might cause the achilles tendon to become inflamed – referred to as a tendinopathy. Sometimes the inflammation in the tendon is mechanical in nature. This means the problem is caused by incorrect mechanics when we run. The solution, while a very keen runner may not like to hear it, might be to reduce time on the road and go to the gym.

Strengthening and Lengthening

Strengthening and lengthening the damaged tissue is a key factor in rehabilitation. No better place than the gym for this. If you are worried about technique, frequency, sets, reps, loading, tempo, duration, rest or any of the above – we can help.

  • Firstly, we will walk you through the process in clinic.
  • Secondly, we will send on all the exercises from our video library
  • Thirdly, we can monitor your progress from afar, but with room for a helping hand
  • Finally, we will discharge you back to healthy happy living as soon as we possibly can

So in order to get yourself back out on the roads, or back in the gym, come to Personal Health….

Book Online here: https://personalhealth.janeapp.com/

 

Running, Prehab, Physiotherapy, Hip, Knee

Preparing for Joint Replacement Surgery – PREHAB??

 

Are you on a waiting list for joint replacement?

If so, it is an ideal time to manage your recovery – by starting NOW!

We mean start your rehabilitation before surgery – commonly known as Prehabilitation or Prehab!

The stronger and fitter you are before a major surgery the better your response to general anaesthetic or epidurals. This is a medical/lifestyle issue more than anything to do with your arthritic joint.

In the case of joint replacements, typically the decision for surgery has been made carefully and responsibly between yourself and your orthopaedic consultant based on various issues;

  • excessive pain levels
  • day to day basic activities have been compromised
  • difficulty walking even short distances

As your arthritic joint has deteriorated significantly, so too has it’s range of motion. This means all the surrounding muscles for this joint have become shortened and weaker.

Post surgical rehabilitation of these muscles is a long and sometimes arduous journey.

However, addressing soft tissue (muscle/tendon) weakness now can have really positive effects.

With increased muscular strength around the replaced joint your capacity to bear weight will be optimal in the days immediately post surgery.

Also, you will get a quicker restoration of range within the joint. In the case of knee replacements, you will need to bend the knee beyond 90 degrees in the days immediately post surgery – so your preparation now can only aid this process.

Hip Replacement

In the case of hips, you will need strength in the muscles around the replaced hip joint to ensure there is stability in the joint. This prevents any complications such as dislocating the replaced joint. This type of dislocation can happen when the surrounding soft tissue structures are not strong enough to hold the replaced joint in its new position.

A well prepared patient whose has gone through Prehab, usually means slightly quicker discharge times for those who dislike the hospital setting. Some people go to specialised rehabilitation facilities, while others safely return home and choose to work on their recovery with the support of physiotherapists, family and friends.

Start the Journey Today

Ultimately joint replacement is all about the capacity to regain functional activity. It’s about improving quality of life – whether this is simply to enjoy walking again, or golf, tennis (usually doubles tennis!) and even more personal issues such as improved sex life due to reduced joint pain.

Everybody has a reason, or multiple reasons, to embark on this journey. With the support of your consultant, the hospital staff throughout the procedure, and those who deal with you in the months following surgery, everybody is trying to make this a new lease of life for the patient.

So why not give it your best shot in the lead up??

For more information on Preparation for Surgery contact us now:

01 4964002

info@personalhealth.ie

www.personalhealth.ie