Posts

Pelvic Girdle Pain During Pregnancy – Women’s Health Physiotherapy

Pelvic Girdle Pain During Pregnancy -Women’s Health Physiotherapy

What is it?

Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) is a collection of uncomfortable symptoms caused by a stiffness of your pelvic joints or the joints moving unevenly at either the back or front of your pelvis. 

It is not harmful to your baby, but it can cause severe pain around your pelvic area and make it difficult for you to get around.

Around 20% of women suffer from Pelvic girdle pain.

Different women have different symptoms, and PGP is worse for some women than others.

Symptoms can include:

  • Pain over the pubic bone at the front in the center
  • Pain across one or both sides of your lower back
  • Pain in the area between your vagina and anus (perineum)
  • Pain in your buttocks.

Pain can also radiate to your thighs, and some women feel or hear a clicking or grinding in the pelvic area.

          

   

The pain can be most noticeable when you are:

  • Turning in Bed
  • Going upstairs
  • Walking
  • Standing on one leg (e.g. getting dressed)
  • Getting out of car
  • Standing up

What Causes PGP:

Sometimes there is no obvious explanation for the cause of PGP.

Usually, there is a combination of factors causing PGP.

Relaxin: During pregnancy, the placenta produces a hormone called relaxin, which softens your ligaments to loosen up your joints. Relaxin is very important as by loosening the joints it allows your baby to pass through more easily during childbirth however it can lead to the pelvic girdle becoming less stable and therefore painful during pregnancy.

Occasionally the position of the baby may also produce symptoms related to PGP.

With PGP the degree of discomfort you are feeling may vary from being intermittent and irritating to being very wearing and upsetting.

  

Treatment

Physiotherapy: Advice, Education, Exercises and Manual techniques can help!

The sooner it is identified and assessed the better it can be managed which may help to speed up your recovery, reducing the impact of PGP on your life.

If you have symptoms that do not improve within a week or two, or interfere with your normal day-to-day life, you may have PGP and should ask for help from your midwife, GP, physiotherapist or other health carer.

Tips:

  • Continue to be as active as your can within your pain limits, and avoid activities that make your pain worse.
  • Ensure your back is well supported while you sit down. This can be achieved by placing a towel between the curve of your back and the chair.
  • Wear flat, supportive shoes and avoid standing for long periods.
  • Get help with household chores from friends, partner, and family.
  • Rest when you can.
  • Sit down to get dressed-e.g. Don’t stand on one leg when putting on jeans.
  • Try and make sure any weight you carry is evenly distributed- this means no shoulder bags, and try nit to left your toddler up onto your hip.
  • Be careful and take your time doing any activities that may put strain on your pelvis i.e. getting out of a car- keep your knees together and squeeze your buttocks.
  • Sleep with a pillow between your legs
  • Squeeze your buttocks and keep your knees together when turning in bed.
  • Take the stairs one at a time, leading with the less painful leg.

Avoid:

  • Standing on one leg
  • Bending and twisting to lift
  • Carrying a baby on one hip
  • Crossing your legs
  • Sitting on the floor or in a twisted position
  • Sitting or standing for long periods
  • Lifting or pushing heavy objects such as shopping bags, supermarket trolley.
  • Carrying anything in one hand (try using a small back pack).

Physiotherapy

It is important if you pain is not manageable with general advise to book into a physiotherapist. Treatment includes:

  • Assessment
  • Exercises to specifically retrain and strengthen stomach, back, pelvic floor and hip muscles
  • Manual therapy to ensure your spinal, pelvic and hip joints are moving normally or to correct their movement.
  • Acupuncture
  • Exercises in water.
  • Provision of equipment e.g. pelvic girdle support belts, crutches

To Book an appointment with our Women’s Health Physiotherapist Mary-Kate call Personal Health at 01 4964002 or email info@personalhealth.ie.

Back pain,

Preventative Exercises for Santa this Christmas- By Dee Ryan

  Preventative Exercises for Santa this Christmas!

It is well-known to all that Santa has a very busy night ahead on Christmas Eve. We do not doubt that Santa is in top physical shape but we wanted to provide him with a few tips to ensure his risk of injury is at an all- time low to allow him to do what he does best. In order to be specific I am going to focus on the position which Santa will have to adopt for long periods of time  ….. driving his sleigh!

santa1

Santa will spend a lot of time sitting in his sleigh. As with any amount of prolonged sitting there lies the risk of developing low back pain. To ensure he does not stiffen we recommend pelvic tilts in sitting. This will allow Santa to mobilise his low back and to provide a relative stretch to the muscles positioned parallel to his low back. This exercise is simple and straightforward it involves rolling forwards and backwards off the sit-bones in a slow and controlled manner.   His back will be grateful for this movement little and often throughout the night. We feel Santa will find it easier to get on and off the sleigh as a result of keeping his back mobile, especially when considering how cold it will be that high up in the sky.

Sitting at desk

Physio Rathmines

Secondly as Santa is driving his team of superb reindeer he will be holding the reins out in front of his body. This can commonly cause us to allow our shoulders to move forward and to round our upper back. I recommend Santa does shoulder retraction exercises throughout the night. This involves moving the shoulder blades back and down. By doing so he will be enforcing correct alignment of his shoulders and will be opening up through his chest muscles.

shoulder-retraction

    

The third exercise we recommend is seated thoracic rotation- this will mobilise Santa’s upper back. We recommend that Santa continues to hold the reins throughout this exercise and that he hips his hips forwards to further bias his upper back.

Other tips for the night:

When placing the presents under the tree we recommend Santa should bend down onto his knees and keeps the presents in close to his body until he is close to the ground – this will prevent excessively loading his low back.

santa-3

Similarly, when going down the chimney Santa should try keep in arms in close to his body to ensure his shoulders are not stretched beyond their capacity.

Back pain,

Our Team at Personal Health are in complete agreement with Theresa Mannion- we do not condone unnecessary journeys on our roads- particularly over the Christmas period when the weather can be treacherous. However, should you find yourself driving for a prolonged period of time we recommend the top 3 exercises on our list for Santa.

Wishing you a very Merry Christmas from the Team at Personal Health!

Personal Health, Rather Road, Chronic Health intervention

Surprise Your Bones….

Exercise for Osteoporosis

Medically Led Fitness

Responsible Exercise for Osteoperosis

When I was training as a student in Cork University Hospital our lead Clinical Educator, Fiona, had a stock phrase for helping patients with Osteoporosis.

‘Surprise your Bones’ said Fiona regularly, in a gentle Scottish lilt. Whether it was her accent or it’s ‘catchiness’, the phrase seemed to stick!

Fiona was a Clinical Specialist in the area and really believed in the positive benefits of exercise for Osteoporosis. The tricky part is knowing what are the correct exercises, what are the safe ones and what needs to be avoided. The even trickier part is making a class relevant/enjoyable to a 60 year old lady. We know you would rather be on the golf course or anywhere else!

Medically Led Fitness Osteoperosis Classes

Exercise can be responsible and good fun

Personal Health Exercise Classes

At Personal Health, our Chartered Physiotherapists manage a nice happy medium in this class. We aim for the whole thing to be enjoyable, sociable and challenging enough to ‘surprise the bones’ into shape.

Typically Osteoporosis affects females far more than males, usually over the age of 55. It is diagnosed by DEXA scan which is able to measure bone density. This is usually through imaging of the hip bone.

For those managing Osteoporosis it tends to be a quiet process. There’s typically no pain, and one might only be alerted to it’s complexities when in the A&E room after something has caused a fracture.

Areas such as the base of the thumb/ wrist and hip are more vulnerable for fracture. This is based on the age and activity profile of those diagnosed with the disease. Similarly a focussed approach to improving balance and/or falls prevention can be a smart way to approach the condition.

Frequently an osteoporotic patient will be undergoing ‘medical’ management of the condition by taking prescribed tablets –  ’Calcichew’- or something similar. It has various classifications in terms of severity. Often patients opt for a sustained (but finite) period of injection therapy as treatment. These injections aim to increase the strength of cortical bone structure in addition to the focussed dietary and exercise interventions.

Personal Health Dublin 6

Chronic disease is just a definition not a life sentence

Medically Led Fitness

In Personal Health our Medically Led Fitness programmes are geared towards optimising chronic health issues. By definition, ‘chronic’ relates to time and duration – not severity.

So with a chronic diagnosis like Osteoporosis, you have the power to successfully thrive. At Personal Health, we provide a helping hand, some time and a refreshing enjoyable approach to managing your chronic health issue.

2 things about 5 things that tell you nothing…Really Efficiently

Bygone Blissful Days of Youth

Well the world is all about data apparently. Big Data…. The internet of things…. Is it a wearable? What’s your elevator pitch in less than four words? Are you sustainable? Social Media lifestyle.

Recently I saw a post on Facebook talking about something distant. Life as a child. The simplicity of it all.

‘I would fake being asleep so my Dad would carry me to bed. When I swallowed fruit seeds I was scared to death a tree would start to grow in my tummy…..’ I thought the moon followed my car. I would watch two drops of rain roll down the window and pretend it was a race.

The wistful bygone days. Not very data driven. And so the struggle began. Please disassociate from silliness. Keep abreast of cellular level changes in everything.
Never stand still.

 

IMG_2117

But I still like a giggle….most of all when I’m stressed out???

At Personal Health we are about balance.

If you want measurables we’ve got them. In fact our measurables are better than any entry-level analysis you will get in any Commercial Gym in Ireland.
We are not a gym you see, we are medical professionals trying to sustainably improve your systemic health. How U is that for a USP?
If you’ve got some health problems….Please contact us.

 

Contact us....

Contact us….

 

Prescription

Exercise with freedom and joy.

Savour your wine and let the taste buds dance with your pistachio ice cream.

If you exercise twice a week (anywhere on earth) for 30 minutes at a time …..you have reduced your risk of heart attack by up to 50%. Fact.
Bet your High Performance Officer didn’t mention that.
Yes, add some cauliflower to your plate. Filter it on Instagram(Guilty!) …..Just don’t weigh it!

IMG_3717
This mediocrity is not for some…..

You are fully entitled to wear a Fitbit during a gym class. A Heart Rate monitor (bpm) will fluctuate with exertion. Some other ‘wearable’ will measure your punch power (kilowatts). A Carbon fibre floor plate will gauge your ground contact time (milliseconds) and something else will have your concentric muscle torque (Nm) sorted simultaneously.

2 things about 5 things that tell you nothing….. really efficiently.

That’s more like High Performance. And we don’t do that. Despite the fact it sounds great.
High Performance environments are stress inducing, often on purpose. Cortisol tends to identify rather easily who wants to run and who wants to fight. Usually it involves elite level performers dedicated to their pursuit in a full time professional and handsomely remunerated environment.

Sometimes it is joy-less. I’ve been involved in it for nearly 15 years in a sporting capacity. The good days outweigh the bad. But not by much.

HP is all over the Corporate environment too. Mediated by Wellness tools of course and an occasional banana on your desk. It’s progressive at times but there’s a tipping point. You know where it is.

Personal NCT

If you want measurables, why not measure your internal health?
A personal MOT for you and your lifestyle, not the car, or the company.

God knows there’s enough going on with your body breaking down, relationships, kids and mortgage.
You are smart enough to perform highly all day in work…. You know exactly what to do next.
When those two raindrops were rolling down the window you were measuring them after all.
But didn’t you enjoy the race?

 

pain, chronic pain, exercise, physio, physiotherapy

Do you really understand your pain? by Dee Ryan, Chartered Physiotherapist

Pain is often misunderstood, and as a result can cause fear. This fear and confusion can drive our pain experience. This blog explores the true meaning of pain with you. It might facilitate a different approach to your pain management, and hopefully can improve your coping strategies.

Pain is the body’s alarm system. It is designed to be a helpful response to protect you. This alarm system is assisted by your vision, hearing, smell and taste. For example, at halloween you see a bonfire, hear the wood crackling, smell/taste the smoke and feel the warmth. These sensory cues are helping your brain decide how best to respond to a given situation.

FireBeachPain
A key point to understand about pain is that once the brain decides you’re in danger, you will feel pain with or without the presence of tissue damage.

YOUR BRAIN DRIVES YOUR PAIN

Pain can be straight forward. But like most things in life, it can also be a complex process requiring some patience. Pain from direct tissue damage is clearly understood – an ankle sprain for example, see our Rory McIlroy blog:

Here, for example, the ligaments are sprained and in an attempt to protect you (how loving!) your brain decides the ligaments are at risk and need healing. Subsequently pain is felt in order to allow ligament repair and remodelling.
Pain can also be reflective of behaviour, emotions, memories, belief systems and what the pain means to you. A nice analogy for this is to imagine the ingredients of emotion, stress, memory, belief and behaviour are mixed together and make up the batter to a special kind of cake called pain. This cake is cooked in a particular oven called the brain. How the cake of pain turns out is very much so dependent on the oven – what temperature it is cooked at, how long it is cooked for etc. So it is clear the brain directly influences the end product- the pain cake.

 

pain management Personal Health Dublin 6

Is your pain getting out of hand?

Regardless of analogies, there is a proven science to this…..

Our body house these incredible sensors which continuously send messages to the brain via electrical impulses (neural pathways). Some sensors report on temperature, some respond to mechanical change, others to chemical change. There is a certain type of wire called a nociceptor which delivers messages of danger to your brain. They respond to any form of stimulus which is considered a threat. Remember nociception is just the delivery postman of the message, not the message itself.
Not every message being delivered from the sensors reach the brain. At the level of the spinal cord there is a sorting process, and the number of messages being passed is under control. Similar to a bouncer manning a nightclub. The danger messages can sometimes be granted access and are delivered to the brain. Here the brain has to make a decision how best to react to all this information it has been given.

Dee Ryan Chartered Physiotherapist in Dublin 6 discusses the complexity of pain

Those shoes are quite nice mate…..

Next week

Next week I will discuss the various systems which the brain calls upon in its response to these issues. Similarly I will expand on the effects of pain over a prolonged period of time- known as ‘chronic pain’.
Be a friend and tag a friend who you feel will benefit from further understanding the processes involved in the pain experience!

And now my parting gift to you until next week….a superb video which explains pain in less than 5 minutes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWMKucuejIs

 

Cycling, physio, physiotherapist, movement, fitness, health

Summer, Sunshine & Spandex by Tim Ahern, Chartered Physiotherapist

We cyclists call it Lycra and there is a lot of it about lately. Here on Rathgar road we see hundreds of commuters and leisure cyclists pass by our clinic on their way to and from work every morning. This is great to see. All sorts of people are cycling now on all sorts of machines. Some new, some old and many ill-fitting.

IMG_1189

New to Cycling?

For those of you who are new to cycling and training for that first triathlon, charity cycle or are just beginning in the sport, bike fit is important. The usual hotspots of discomfort for the beginner include the lower back and the back-side. This is a normal and temporary phenomenon. But often times pain and discomfort in these areas persists. Knee, neck and wrist pain are also common. Therefore having a bike that is comfortable and suitably set-up for your requirements is a must in order to minimise or indeed prevent such injuries. Appropriate bike set-up is key to enjoying injury free cycling and this becomes more pertinent as time in the saddle increases. Despite the myriad of different bike designs and new technologies available, a bicycle remains a bicycle.

IMG_1551

Rider and bike have 5 contact points, both hands, both feet and the one bottom! The bike is a symmetrical machine. Many of us are not. Parameters such as handlebar reach, handlebar type and angle, the degree of knee flexion in pedal stroke, shoe cleat position and saddle position are the main interfaces between the rider and the bike. That results in a huge number of possible position permutations. Many people are now measured and fitted for their bikes before they purchase them. This is very useful. As with clothes, not everyone can buy “off the peg”.

MLF cycling

 

Assessment

Personal Health offer an individualised assessment of the individual’s anatomy and injury history. We take into account the type, the intensity and the volume of cycling of each client. We don’t try to make radical changes to set-up or position, rather we look at making micro adjustments to the bike set-up. This may stave off injury and reduce discomfort based on our physical assessment of the body first, and then the bike.

Based on our findings, we will provide a relevant exercise programme for the body. This is a bespoke service and some clients require more focus on the physical and others require more attention on the bike set-up. Most often though, it is a combination of the two.

Tim Ahern is a Chartered Physiotherapist, an Exercise Physiologist, and a hugely passionate cyclist. He is an integral part of Personal Health, providing a valuable link between our clinical expertise and the practical aspects of exercise prescription. 

Mobility, Flexibility, fitness, movement, health

The Pursuit of Flexibility

As the years go by, the pursuit of flexibility can be a wistful bygone goal. In reality we stiffen up a fair bit as time flies. So, what seemed to be regular flexible movement at one stage, now seems difficult to attain. Why do I groan all of a sudden when I’m standing up from a chair ???

Let’s be kind to ourselves here – mobility and flexibility are often impossible due to our lifestyle demands. Similarly, if we do find some free time, is stretching a priority? It seems so boring… Perhaps not?

Well, there is a lot more to flexibility than static muscle stretching…. A lot more!

And best of all, it can genuinely provide relief, positively affecting your mood.

 

Be kind to each other

Many components affect our flexibility including:

Joint Capsule
Muscle
Ligaments
Tendons
Nerves

I am going to focus on joint stiffness in the thoracic (mid) spine as this is a common presentation across office workers. It is also equally common in multiple sports including cycling, rowing, boxing, wrestling and hockey.  Here is why…

The thoracic spine is the area of our spine located between your neck and low back. Thoracic mobility is important for optimal movement. The mobility of spinal joints and their surrounding capsules adapt depending on the activities performed. Multiple sports require the athlete to move with their arms positioned in front of their body, this positional demands often result in the shoulders sitting forward and a round upper back consequently increasing the risk of developing stiffness in this area.

As the mobility of the thoracic spine affects the function of the shoulders, neck and low back, it is strongly recommended to spend time ensuring your thoracic mobility is being maintained. It is all about balance.

IMG_2129
The more time you spend sitting at your desk, or training, then the more time you need to invest in maintaining your mobility and flexibility. To prevent long-term changes the idea is to position your body in the opposite positions from what you train or work in. For most people this will involve mobilising your upper back in extension and in combined extension and rotation. In other words, straightening your spine.

Over the past years I have found the following thoracic mobility exercises to be highly effective in maintaining and restoring thoracic movement:

1.Thoracic extension on foam roller:

Stretches the pectoral muscles and forces extension in the upper back. Ensure your low back is flattened on the roller for most efficiency. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 2-3 times. You can alter the position of your arms between 90 degrees and 120 degrees to bias different areas of your upper back. See image below.

IMG_3255 (1)

 

2. Segmental flexion and extension over the foam roller:

Place fingers on temples to promote thoracic extension. Position the foam roller horizontally and roll along your upper back. Stop at the segments which feel more uncomfortable and stiff. To bias the mobility at these segments, slowly extend over the roller towards the ground. Support your lower back whilst doing this by tucking your bum in. See pictures below as the athlete moves from thoracic flexion into segmental extension.

IMG_3256 IMG_3257

 

 

 

 

3. Bows and Arrows:

Position yourself in side-lying so that shoulders and hips are in line. Bend your knees so that your hips and knees are in line (this offloads your low back ensuring the movement is coming form your upper back). Outstretch both arms. Reach the top hand past the bottom hand and then pull backwards as though drawing the arrow on a bow. In this drawing back motion, aim to have the top shoulder facing up towards the ceiling. This is a slow and controlled movement and aim for 10 repetitions 2-3 times on each side. See the images below.

IMG_3258

IMG_3259

4. Shaking it all out:

Finally, if all else fails….Try loosely and gently relaxing your stomach, if you have ‘a belly’ (everybody does by the way) let it real and hang over your belt. Then gently allow some light  shaking through all the main joints, neck, shoulder, spine, hips, knees, ankles and feet. Just like the way Diego Maradona used to warm up for football games…..

 

 

Tag a friend if you feel this article is relevant to them, or that co-worker who constantly complain of upper back stiffness! If you have any further questions or queries regarding thoracic mobility or wish to purchase a foam roller contact us at Personal Health on 01 4964002 or email info@personalhealth.ie.

The Very Real And Emotional Struggles Of Having A Fitbit (Or Does Your Fitbit Have You?)

The Very Real And Emotional Struggles Of Having A Fitbit (Or Does Your Fitbit Have You?)

My Fitbit journey began a month ago. I had plagued my husband with hints of getting me one and well, yes to my own disbelief, he actually must have listened, as one day he arrived home with one for me!

I was thrilled or so I thought but very quickly I began to realise, I didn’t own this Fitbit……..this Fitbit owns me! This is what happens when you let a Fitbit into your life:

You live for the sole purpose of getting to you daily Fitbit goals:

Waiting for that little buzz when you get to 10,000 steps and then pathetically self-high-five-ing is perhaps the least glamorous moment of your day.

fitbit steps nailed

 

You get angry if you don’t have it on when you walk:

If you walk without wearing your Fitbit, does it even count as walking? I know there is no logic to this. I do know that. But on days when you happen to forget your Fitbit, you wonder why you even bothered getting out of bed in the first place. If Fitbit isn’t counting them, are these steps even real? Is anything?

no fitbit don't move

 

Fitbit’s validation becomes more important than the opinions of human beings:

IT LIKES ME. IT REALLY LIKES ME. Oh, whoa, did I get fired? It’s cool, I got 11,000 steps today so I’m pretty much crushing it-whoop!

Fitbit-meme-not-crazy-just-Fitbitting

 

You’re constantly jumping up and down for seemingly no reason:

Anyone who has ever stood next to me in work or while waiting to cross the road or in the queue at Tesco’s have probably been only one step away from calling to get me committed.

5a2ba85b3a223e7c8354eff5b53f0632

 

You have jumping marathons before you go to bed:

Nothing is more unbearable than the idea of resting your head on a pillow when you’re at 9,000 steps. Time to wake up all the neighbours!!

bed fitbit

 

(If Im being brutally honest, I have had evenings where I’ve got me children to wear it for an hour or two before they go to bed to get me to my target while I put the feet up. I’m just being a good mother and encouraging them to be active-right??!)

 

 

Your worst enemy is yourself:

One day I reached 30,000 steps in one day & the my Fitbit sent a text to my phone telling me I was an “Overachiever”. I told everyone I met that day just how great I was! My husband & children couldn’t bare to be in the same room as me! An overachiever at last!! But then it dawned on me, that the only way I’d ever feel this good about myself again was by topping it, and there are only 24 hours in a day. Can we use all of them for stepping??-NO. Will we try anyway?? CATCH ME IF YOU CAN.

 

nailed fitbit

 

The American Heart Association uses the 10,000 steps metric as a guideline to follow for improving health and decreasing risk of heart disease, the number one killer of men and women in America.

How do I fit all that walking into my busy day?- Here’s a few tips:

  • get off the bus early and walk the rest of the way home or to work
  • walk to the station instead of taking the car or bus
  • take the stairs instead of the lift, or walk up escalators
  • walk the children to school, whatever the weather
  • get a dog- they really help get you out and about and reach those 10,00 steps

How Can Personal Health help you reach your 10,000 steps per day?

Attend one of our 30 minute Medically Led fitnesses classes-

Personal Health’s 30 min fitness classes are designed and implemented by our medically qualified team. Classes vary from session to session. This variety provides a greater all round level of fitness and flexibility and most importantly, it keeps classes interesting and fun. Suitable for all fitness levels.

To see schedule & Book visit our website now….www.personalhealth.ie

 

 

 

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.persoanlhealth.ie

Physio, Golf, Tennis, Physiotherapy, Fitness, Exercise

Tennis Elbow, Golfers Elbow or both – the dreaded Country club!!

Tennis Elbow, Golfers Elbow or both – the dreaded Country club!! 

country club

 

I’m regularly asked about both Golfers & Tennis elbow in the clinic. Generally they are a large portion of the non-contact elbow injuries that patients develop. Commonly, it’s a term that people have heard of but are not quite sure what it actually is! Golf or tennis may not be on your list of hobbies to be struck down!

A tennis elbow is an irritation of the tendon on the outside or lateral part of the elbow whilst a golfer’s elbow is an irritation of the tendon on the inside or medial part of the elbow.

If you are unlucky enough to develop both, you become a member of the “Country Club!”

 

Golfers-vs-Tennis-Elbow

 

Basically, the majority of the muscles in our forearms anchor to either the inside or outside of the elbow via a shared tendon. When we overload these tendons from things such as hitting 200 golf balls off a rubber mat or deciding to tackle painting the house in one swoop, we can cause a painful episode in these tendons.

It’s a very common problem. I always like to take people through the anatomy of the issue. Understanding is the key to settling this problem down. We are fortunate to have some state  of the art anatomy tools to facilitate this in the Personal Health clinic.

 

image_Blue_elbow-pain

 

Acute or Long-Standing Issue

The next question is whether it is an acute flare up or a long standing grumbling issue? This largely dictates the management and treatment. Conservative management with appropriate exercise, soft tissue work and de-loading of the tendon resolve this issue in the majority of cases. Surgery and injections are thankfully relatively rare.

 

 

 

Call us to find out more.

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.persoanlhealth.ie