The Very Real And Emotional Struggles Of Having A Fitbit (Or Does Your Fitbit Have You?)

The Very Real And Emotional Struggles Of Having A Fitbit (Or Does Your Fitbit Have You?)

My Fitbit journey began a month ago. I had plagued my husband with hints of getting me one and well, yes to my own disbelief, he actually must have listened, as one day he arrived home with one for me!

I was thrilled or so I thought but very quickly I began to realise, I didn’t own this Fitbit……..this Fitbit owns me! This is what happens when you let a Fitbit into your life:

You live for the sole purpose of getting to you daily Fitbit goals:

Waiting for that little buzz when you get to 10,000 steps and then pathetically self-high-five-ing is perhaps the least glamorous moment of your day.

fitbit steps nailed

 

You get angry if you don’t have it on when you walk:

If you walk without wearing your Fitbit, does it even count as walking? I know there is no logic to this. I do know that. But on days when you happen to forget your Fitbit, you wonder why you even bothered getting out of bed in the first place. If Fitbit isn’t counting them, are these steps even real? Is anything?

no fitbit don't move

 

Fitbit’s validation becomes more important than the opinions of human beings:

IT LIKES ME. IT REALLY LIKES ME. Oh, whoa, did I get fired? It’s cool, I got 11,000 steps today so I’m pretty much crushing it-whoop!

Fitbit-meme-not-crazy-just-Fitbitting

 

You’re constantly jumping up and down for seemingly no reason:

Anyone who has ever stood next to me in work or while waiting to cross the road or in the queue at Tesco’s have probably been only one step away from calling to get me committed.

5a2ba85b3a223e7c8354eff5b53f0632

 

You have jumping marathons before you go to bed:

Nothing is more unbearable than the idea of resting your head on a pillow when you’re at 9,000 steps. Time to wake up all the neighbours!!

bed fitbit

 

(If Im being brutally honest, I have had evenings where I’ve got me children to wear it for an hour or two before they go to bed to get me to my target while I put the feet up. I’m just being a good mother and encouraging them to be active-right??!)

 

 

Your worst enemy is yourself:

One day I reached 30,000 steps in one day & the my Fitbit sent a text to my phone telling me I was an “Overachiever”. I told everyone I met that day just how great I was! My husband & children couldn’t bare to be in the same room as me! An overachiever at last!! But then it dawned on me, that the only way I’d ever feel this good about myself again was by topping it, and there are only 24 hours in a day. Can we use all of them for stepping??-NO. Will we try anyway?? CATCH ME IF YOU CAN.

 

nailed fitbit

 

The American Heart Association uses the 10,000 steps metric as a guideline to follow for improving health and decreasing risk of heart disease, the number one killer of men and women in America.

How do I fit all that walking into my busy day?- Here’s a few tips:

  • get off the bus early and walk the rest of the way home or to work
  • walk to the station instead of taking the car or bus
  • take the stairs instead of the lift, or walk up escalators
  • walk the children to school, whatever the weather
  • get a dog- they really help get you out and about and reach those 10,00 steps

How Can Personal Health help you reach your 10,000 steps per day?

Attend one of our 30 minute Medically Led fitnesses classes-

Personal Health’s 30 min fitness classes are designed and implemented by our medically qualified team. Classes vary from session to session. This variety provides a greater all round level of fitness and flexibility and most importantly, it keeps classes interesting and fun. Suitable for all fitness levels.

To see schedule & Book visit our website now….www.personalhealth.ie

 

 

 

Phone: 01 496 4002

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.persoanlhealth.ie

Diet, Nutrition, weight, dietitian, dublin 6

Diet, Nutrition…. what is all the fuss about?

Diet, Nutrition…. what is all the fuss about?

what is nutrition

 

When giving presentations I often ask my audience “why do you think diet is so important?”.

Various responses are given; “to lose weight”, “prevent heart problems”,“ prevent diabetes” which are all true but they are long term effects of good nutrition. It is amazing to see how few people think about the short term effects of eating a healthy balanced diet.

We are living busy lives trying to juggle family life, work, friends, exercise to say nothing of diet. Few people have time to sit down and think about their diet and how it affects them.

balanced diet

 

Eating a balanced diet in addition to having regular meals throughout the day can:

  • Boost your energy levels
  • Prevent sugar cravings
  • Protect your digestive health
  • Stop that sluggish feeling after a heavy meal
  • Prevent low mood
  • Boost your immune system
  • Improve your concentration levels
  • Encourage self esteem

Reduce risk

In addition to the short term effects of good nutrition, in the long run a healthy diet can reduce your risk of developing:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Cancer
  • Stroke
  • Osteoporosis
  • Anaemia
  • Diverticulitis
  • Irritable bowel syndrome

In fact, many illnesses can be as a result of our genes which we can do nothing about. However, we are in control of modifiable risk factors such as our diet and physical activity and can reduce the risk of various diseases.

How can Personal Health help you to achieve a healthy diet?

Finally, our Consultant Dietitian can assist you and help you to improve your diet by;

  • identifying your specific nutritional needs
  • providing dietary and lifestyle advice tailored to your needs
  • coupled with developing tailored resources such as recipes, meal plans, shopping lists to help you to achieve your goals too
  • providing encouragement and motivation in a supportive, non-judgemental environment.

Diet teamCall us to find out more.

Phone 01 496 4002                                                                      

Email: info@personalhealth.ie

Website: www.personalhealth.ie