Improve your Brain Health- By Marion Slattery

Over the last number of years, it seems that increasingly in the media we are seeing people live with neurological conditions that affect the brain such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Stroke and other disorders. At the same time there has never been so much emphasis on the benefits of regular exercise and the optimum diet for a healthy body and brain.

We are being bombarded in the media with information written by specialists, experts, bloggers, and anyone with a social media account,  having their weigh-in. Everyone has an opinion on what good health is but is there a simple one size fits all formula to follow?

Having attended the lecture on ‘Our Beautiful Minds: Our Brains and how they shape our lives’‘ earlier this week by Professor Shane O Mara, Professor of Experimental Brain Research in Trinity College, I learned that maybe being healthy isn’t as complex as all the newspapers, magazines, and online media make out. The three main points I took from the lecture were simple in their own way. He highlighted the importance of exercise, sleep, and giving your brain a chance to rest. Very simple suggestions but can we actually follow through? Why should we even try?

Looking at the most recent statistics in Ireland, it is estimated that over 700,000 people in Ireland live with a neurological condition, representing about 17% of the total population of Ireland. These conditions include acquired brain injury, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other progressive, intermittent or disabling conditions of the brain or spinal cord. While not all neurological conditions are preventable, there are certain things we can do that can reduce our risk of developing these conditions.

Poor health is never far from anyone’s door and it makes no exception to your social status, religion, race, or otherwise. Last year the infamous Billy Connolly came out to speak about his diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease. In the last few years the country music singer Glenn Campbell, made known for his hit ‘Rhinestone Cowboy’ released the movie of his farewell tour as a result of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. Last year Amy Huberman and Brian O’Driscoll  featured on the cover of the Irish ‘Parkinson’s Ireland’ Summer magazine as Amy’s father is living with Parkinson’s Disease. As we are living longer we are also living longer with and developing neurological conditions.

With increasing evidence linking exercise and diet, mindfulness and relaxation to improved health, we need to look at what we can do on a daily basis to maintain good body and brain health. Over the age of 30 on average you lose slightly less than 0.5% of your brain each year. It has now been proven that by exercising alone you can increase the size of your hippocampus, a part of the brain that makes memory.  Research also supports being socially active, it reduces your risk of dementia.

Here are some more suggestions to improve your body and brain health:

·         Exercise regularly

·         Maintain a good sleep routine

·         Give your brain a rest

·         Eat a well-balanced diet

·         Challenging your brain

o   Read a book

o   Do a crossword

o   Travel to new places

·         Learn something new

·         Keep socially active

·         Keep a check on your cholesterol/blood pressure/ weight

·         Adopt a positive attitude

Our generation are living longer but we need to ensure that we’re living Better too. Give yourself the best chance at ageing well.

Lowering Your Cholesterol The Healthy Way- Caoimhe O’Leary

Have you had your cholesterol checked?

More people die in Ireland today from heart disease than any other illness. It accounts for 36% of deaths in Ireland. The positive news is that 80% of the incidence of heart disease can be prevented by improving lifestyle factors. Unfortunately, we are not in control of other risk factors such as age, gender and genetic predisposition to illness. We are however in control of modifiable risk factors such as cholesterol, blood pressure and smoking and if taken care of we can reduce the risk of developing heart disease.

Get your cholesterol and blood pressure checked!

Cholesterol is a waxy substance of which 75% is produced by the liver and 25% can be found in certain foods.

It is essential in producing all the body’s cells and hormones, and is needed to make vitamin D and bile for digestion.  However, when your blood has too much cholesterol this can stick to the walls of arteries. A build-up of cholesterol in the arteries, narrows the arteries restricting the amount of blood flow to the brain and heart. This can eventually cause a blockage leading to a heart attack or stroke.

Cholesterol is carried in the blood attached to proteins called lipoproteins. There are two main lipoproteins: LDL (low density lipoprotein) and HDL (high density lipoprotein). Too much LDL is unhealthy therefore it is referred to as bad cholesterol and should be kept low. HDL is protective however and helps to remove LDL cholesterol. HDL is known as the good cholesterol and should be kept high.

What do the numbers mean?

One of the best ways of taking control of your cholesterol is through a healthy diet and physical activity.

Choosing a healthy diet low in saturated fat (butter, cream, cheese, coconut oil, palm oil, lard, fatty meat, processed meats, confectionary foods) is one way of reducing your cholesterol levels. Aim to consume less than 20g saturated fat per day to help to reduce your LDL cholesterol. When reading food-labels avoid anything more than 5g saturated fat per 100g.

It’s not all about cutting out the bad stuff – the good news is that there are foods you can introduce into your diet that will also help to lower your cholesterol levels.

  1. Nuts – with their positive nutrient profile of fibre, falvonoids and monounsaturated fats, have been shown to lower cholesterol by 3-7.5% and reduce the risk of heart disease by 37% . Aim for 30g unsalted almonds, pecans, pistachios, walnuts or peanuts per day.


  1. Soluble fibre – found in fruit, vegetables, oats, beans and pulses can lower LDL cholesterol by 5-20% if you consume 15-20g per day. Increase foods containing oat beta – glucan (porridge, oatbran, oatcakes, porridge bread)  and other wholegrains, beans and pulses (aim for 80-100g per day).


  1. Oil rich fish – a rich source of unsaturated fats especially omega 3 which have heart protective benefits. Aim to have 1-2 servings (140g) per week – salmon, sardines, mackerel, kipper, trout, anchovies, eel, pilchards, fresh tuna, sprats, whitebait, whiting. Other healthy fats include olive oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, corn oil, avocado, olives, nuts and seeds.


  1. As always recommended increase your fruit and vegetables to 5-7 portions per day. A portion is approximately 80g per day. Consumption of at least 400g fruit and vegetables per day has been associated with lower incidence of heart disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, cancer and obesity. They are low in calories, high in phytonutrients, soluble fibre, antioxidants and vitamins and minerals.


  1. Plant stanols or sterols are structurally similar to cholesterol and are naturally found in a wide range of foods such as nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. They mimic cholesterol and compete with it for absorption. Most diets provide a small amount of plant stanols/sterols (approx 300mg for average person, or 600mg for those on vegetarian diets) however an intake of 1.5-2.4g per day has been shown to reduce cholesterol by 7-10% over 2-3 weeks. You can achieve this by including plant stanol or sterol fortified dairy foods in your diet or taking a supplement containing plant stanols or sterols. Always check with your GP if you are taking medication for your cholesterol.


  1. Soya foods – consumption of 15g-25g soya protein daily has been scientifically proven to lower LDL cholesterol by 4-10%. Include more soya products in the diet such as soya beans, soya yoghurts, soya  milk, tofu, edamame beans.


For further information on cholesterol and diet why not attend a cholesterol workshop at Personal Health Rathmines carried out by Consultant Dietitian Caoimhe McDonald where she will provide you with practical tips on a cholesterol lowering diet in a supportive environment.

Next Cholesterol Workshop Date: Wednesday 12th April 7-8pm

Book your place now at 01-4964002

Pregnancy yoga Rtahmines

Get your Asana on with Prenatal Yoga at Personal Health – 5 Yoga Poses every Moma-to-be needs to Know- By Cathy O’Grady

Pregnancy is a truly magical time in any woman’s life, but adjusting to all those physical & emotional changes, can be quite challenging. Prenatal yoga is a wonderful way to help Momas-to-be, to find their zen whilst navigating their journey to motherhood.

It’s not all about the asana of course. Learn useful breathing techniques (pranayama), that can be taken with you in your labour bag, to pull out when the big day finally arrives.

Childs pose/ Balasana

Childs pose

From hands & knees, big toes touch, take knees out wide, sit back towards heels, whilst walking hands straight out in front, straight arms. Bring forehead down to rest on mat or support. Inhale walking finger tips away, exhale sitting deeper back towards heels. Repeat. Breathe.

Benefits: Resting pose. Releases lower back pain. Lengthens the spine, allowing energy to run more freely through the entire body. Encourages one to focus, reconnect with the breath & quieten the mind. One to use at any stage throughout pregnancy, labour & motherhood (we all need a little time out by times).

Bound Angle Pose/Baddha Konasana


From sitting, bring soles of feet together & draw them as close to the perineum as comfortable. Soften the knees out to sides. Can use props to support knees if hips are particularly tight. Lengthen spine, chin neutral, breast bone reaching forward. May gently press elbows to inner thighs deepening the stretch. Breathe.

Benefits: Lenghtens & releases hip & inner groin muscles. Stretches the lower back & thighs.

Mountain Posture/Tadasana

Stand with feet hip width apart (or wider in latter stages of pregnancy). Root down through 4 corners of feet, micro lift of kneecap, neutral pelvis, soft in tummy, long lift of spine, shoulders set, neutral chin, crown of head drawing up towards ceiling, arms extended away from body, palms facing ahead. Breathe.

Benefits: Strengthens the entire body. Opens the heart centre, stabilising the shoulder blades, encouraging good posture. It’s useful in releasing tension/tightness, especially from the shoulders.

Garland pose/ Malasana

Step feet out to mat distance apart pointing at 45-degree angles. Hands to heart centre. Inhale lengthen, exhale squat down, bringing elbows to inner thighs, heels may lift (can place blocks/supports under heels if lifted). Eye gaze straight ahead, chin neutral. Breathe.

Benefits: Hip opener, leg strengthener, encourages baby deeper into pelvis (particularly beneficial in the latter weeks of pregnancy/early labour).

Corpse pose/Savasana

Lie on left hand side, with support under the head to keep head & neck in line. Keep left leg straight & bend right knee at 90-degree angle, resting it on top of a bolster/support. Relax arms/hands in comfortable position. Teacher may assist by placing a support behind the back. Breathe naturally. Let go.

Benefits: Encourages deep rest & relaxation. Left lateral lying also encourages maximum blood flow to the uterus & baby.

*You can attend our Midwife led Prenatal Classes here in Personal Health with Cathy O’Grady on Tuesdays at 7pm and Saturday’s at 10.30am. Pre booking is necessary. €90 for 6 week course- 01-496 4002

Personal health, Dublin 6

Breast Cancer & The Pink Ribbon Program at Personal Health

Breast cancer is the third most common cause of cancer in Ireland. Recent advances in science and medicine include improvements in diagnosis, new operating techniques and progressions in adjuvant therapies. The types of surgery for breast cancer vary widely depending on each individual presentation. Surgery can span from lumpectomy to radical mastectomy. Individuals may also undergo breast reconstruction where skin and fat can be used from the abdomen, the inner thigh and the back.

Often the pain associated with the surgery and loss of movement and strength in the arm is an aspect post surgery which individuals are not prepared for. Especially after exiting the brilliant supportive network that is provided in the hospital setting. Rehabilitative exercise is important at this point in returning to activities of daily living after breast surgery by targeting the previously mentioned movement restrictions and pain.

Pink Ribbon Pilates

Personal Health – 16/17 Rather Road, D6

At Personal Health the Pink Ribbon Program is a specifically designed gentle Pilates based exercise Program for Breast Cancer survivors who are on the road to recovery. The Program is 6 weeks long and there are 2 classes a week. The Program is suitable whether your surgery was recent or several years ago. The program places a strong focus on regaining shoulder mobility and strength and the exercises are specifically tailored taking into the contraindications and precautions of each surgery. The initial assessment performed prior to starting the classes allows us to takes each individual history and to examine the movement of the shoulder joint. The program is led by experienced Physiotherapists and certified breast cancer exercise specialists.

Chartered Physiotherapists specialising in Breast Cancer recovery

Pink Ribbon at Personal Health

The benefits of the program are extensive from both a physical and mental perspective:
Helps regain strength and mobility in the affected shoulder and arm
Improve functional ability and quality of life
Reduce pain and swelling
Reduce the risk of shoulder impingement and frozen shoulder
Improve self confidence and control
Improve core stability and posture
Improve lymphatic drainage- reduce the risk of lymphoedema
Helps to control weight
Improves sleep
Alleviates fatigue
Decrease stress and anxiety


pink Ribbon Programme Dublin 6

Chartered Physiotherapist Dee Ryan


Our aim in Personal Health is to spread the awareness of this Program and to extend the invitation to welcome you into another supportive community during this recovery period. By doing so we hope to bypass the potential burden and stress than can present due to any physical limitations.

As always we ask you to be a friend and forward on this information to anybody you feel would benefit from our Pink Ribbon Program. Should you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact us at the clinic on 01 4964002.

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

Take control of your IBS don’t let it control you- By Caoimhe Mc Donald

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

“Take control of your IBS don’t let it control you”   

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic and relapsing bowel disorder that can affect up to 20% of adults and adolescents as well as children. It is 1.5 times more common in women than in men.  Symptoms include:

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

  • abdominal pain
  • bloating
  • constipation
  • diarrhoea
  • flatulence
  • poor appetite
  • indigestion

It is important to note that many conditions have symptoms that can mimic IBS such as inflammatory bowel disease, coeliac disease and microscopic colitis. It is important that the diagnosis of IBS has been carried out, coeliac disease has been out-ruled and alarm features are absent.

Many people have had symptoms of IBS all their lives and done nothing about it, putting it down to having “a sensitive tummy”. As a Dietitian, I would estimate 60 – 70% of my patients suffer with IBS, some that come to a dietitian for a different reason and drop it into conversation when discussing their diet. People wonder how it has become so much more common these days, but when asked about their family history many report one or both of their parents have avoided a food for years at it “doesn’t agree with them”. 

Irritable Bowel, Dietitian, Rathmines

The truth is, more people feel comfortable discussing their digestive health and doing something about it. People live busy lives that can often be stressful and many are now more conscious of their diet and looking after their health. I have seen patients with such severe symptoms it has a huge impact on their quality of life; unable to attend work, fear of getting public transport, avoiding social activities or not sleeping at night as a result. Why live with something like this when symptoms can be managed effectively?

The exact cause of IBS is not known and it is thought to be multifactorial. Suggested causes may be; a previous gastrointestinal infection, prolonged antibiotic use, stress, medication, alcohol, poor diet and lifestyle factors. Two thirds of IBS patients perceive their symptoms are related to food. Symptoms can come and go and may be exacerbated in stressful situations which can make it difficult to identify the exact triggers.

So how do people go about managing their symptoms of IBS?

Dietitian, Dublin 6, Caoimhe McDonald

  • Medical management using anti-diarrhoeals, anti-spasmodics, laxatives or low dose antidepressants
  • Self-help – 7% treat themselves with no medical supervision
  • Herbal remedies
  • Psychological guidance
  • Probiotics
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Dietary guidance

Diet assessment and adjustment by a qualified dietitian is so important in the management of IBS. Many patients prefer dietary management rather than a reliance on medication. As a dietitian specialising in digestive health, it is very rewarding to see a patients’ symptoms improve when they have received guidance on diet, meal pattern, lifestyle factors and stress management. Some may immediately feel an improvement after increasing fibre in the diet, increasing fluid and introducing exercise. Others may find eliminating certain foods beneficial or the use of a probiotic.

There is a growing interest in restriction of short chain fermentable carbohydrates called FODMAPs (fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, mono-saccharides and polyols….a mouthful I know!) for IBS management. The low FODMAP diet is an exclusion diet specifically for patients with IBS which has been supported by 30 clinical studies. Research has shown that limiting these foods (high in FODMAPS) can alleviate the symptoms associated with IBS.  The low FODMAP diet should be done under the supervision of a dietitian as exclusion diets are at risk of nutritional inadequacy.

If you feel you could benefit from seeing a dietitian in relation to digestive health or any other dietary issue contact Caoimhe McDonald at Personal Health who has worked with patients with IBS for years and can help you identify the triggers for your IBS and provide meal suggestions, recipes and shopping lists to make sure your diet is still balanced and you are getting all the nutrients you need.

Diet is not always the cause-it can be just one contributing factor to IBS. For many stress management may be the best solution. Personal Health also has a Psychotherapist Susan Duffy who specialises in stress management which may be the answer for you.

Contact the Personal Health team to make an appointment with Consultant Dietitian Caoimhe McDonald or Psychotherapist Susan Duffy on 01 4964002.

Chronic Pain by Dee Ryan

The Facts Behind Chronic Pain- by Dee Ryan


As previously mentioned in my last blog when the brain perceives you are in danger it calls upon many systems in its response to this discerned threat including:

  • The muscular system- run away, fight
  • The sympathetic system-increase heart rate, sweat
  • The immune system –promote healing, sensitise neurons
  • The endocrine system-reduce gut and reproductive activity

Together all these systems work together to get you out of trouble creating a pain experience, or motor experience or a stress experience.

When we initially injure our tissues we go through an immediate inflammatory response.  This initial inflammation is to be appreciated as the body’s immune and rebuilding cells are directed to the injured body area. Give thanks, muchas gracias! Often pain is experienced here as the chemicals involved in inflammation can sensitise the nerve endings in the area, causing a barrage of messages to be delivered to the brain. However, as the healing process continues the pain levels should drop as the inflammation subsides and the tissues heal.

Personal Health, Rathgar, Physio

Pain nearly always involves something going on in the tissues! Therefore, managing the tissues involved will help you manage your pain.  Understanding the processes behind the pain experience in both the brain and the tissues will provide you will enormous control in your pain experience. When pain persists past the natural healing time of the tissues we can say with certainty that the brain has concluded that a threat continues and that you still need protection and consequently pain. The central nervous system is highly adaptive and will respond to the demands it is placed under. If continued messages from a damaged, inflamed, scarred or weak tissue continue arriving, the brain gets more tuned to that zone and better at listening. It’s the continuous influx of messages that can lead to the brain ‘over-listening’ to that area and in turn over responding.



personal health, Dee Ryan, Physio,

When this happens you can become aware of more pain in areas that just hurt a little before, or areas that didn’t previously hurt at all now have started to hurt. Rather than calmly supervising the operations on the ground floor the brain has now become a hyper-vigilant boss micromanaging every movement in that sector. The pain persists, spreads, perhaps worsens and now even small movements can become painful. This is an indication that the alarm system can become faulty.

                                                    Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 15.26.46

This enchanced sensitivity of the alarm system is nearly always a feature of ongoing pain. Due to this increase in sensitivity in the tissues, the brain is now acting on faulty information and is no longer receiving accurate information about what is going on in the tissues and so the brain perceives that there is more danger in the tissues than is actually the case.  As a results the brains responses such as thoughts, beliefs, immune, muscular, endocrine are amplified and exaggerated. Oh my! At this stage brain in attempt to look out for you makes those body parts harder to use….does this sound familiar to you?

  For fear of over-informing I will leave you to digest the above information and in my next blog I will explore further changes that can occur in the brain during chronic pain. As before, be a friend and tag a friend who you feel will benefit from further understanding the processes involved in the pain experience! For further information or to book an appointment with Dee, contact us at Personal Health on 416 4002.

Women's Heath Chartered Physiotherapy

2 Simple Exercises to strengthen your Pelvic Floor – Women’s Health Physiotherapy

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training. Pelvic floor muscles are very important as they:

  • Control the bladder and bowel
  • Support the pelvic organs and thus help prevent prolapse
  • Are important for sexual function
  • Support the growing uterus when pregnant
  • Work with core muscles to support the spine


Women's Health

The Supportive ‘Hammock’ of the Pelvic Floor

Where are they?

They attach to the pubic bone at the front and tail bone at the back and to the side of the pelvic walls.
They are the only horizontal muscle in your body and often described as a hammock that supports the pelvic organs.


What can weaken the Pelvic floor?

  • Regular straining to empty the bowel
  • Constant coughing
  • Weight of baby and hormones during pregnancy
  • Muscle damage and interventions used during birth
  • Work involving regular heavy lifting
  • Excessive abdominal workouts or over challenging exercise
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Hysterectomy and some pelvic surgery.
Pelvic Floor function at Personal Health, Dublin 6

         The Correct Exercise is Vital


Pelvic floor muscles cause problems when they are….

  • Weak and not strong enough to lift when you run or sneeze
  • Tight and cannot relax
  • Over powered by excessive tightness in trunk and waist muscles
  • 1 in 3 women experience incontinence after labor due to pelvic floor dysfunction.



Benefits of Pelvic Floor Exercises:

  • Restoration of vaginal muscle tone and vaginal health
  • Recover from physical stress of childbirth
  • Prevention and treatment of stress urinary incontinence.
  • Strengthen the pelvic floor muscles
  • Increase blood supply and nerve supply to the pelvic region
  • Increases sexual stimulation and feeling


2 Simple Exercises to strengthen your Pelvic Floor

It is important for all women before and after birth whether they have a vaginal or cesarean delivery to strengthen their pelvic floor muscles.

1. Long Hold:
Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet supported but apart.
Squeeze and lift around all 3 openings in your pelvic 
floor. These being your back passage vagina and bladder. Like you are 
trying to stop yourself passing wind and urine.
Hold for 6-10 seconds, keep your abdominal, buttock and 
thigh muscles relaxed and continue to breathe 
Relax for 3 seconds.
Repeat this exercise another 5 times
Repeat 3 times a day.
As your pelvic floor muscles get stronger, practice in 
sitting and standing.
Gradually increase the hold time and number of repetitions until you can do a 10 second hold 10 times.
Remember…Always stop exercising when the muscle fatigues.
2. Quick holds
Tighten the pelvic floor muscles as above but only hold for a second before letting go fully.
Repeat 5 times in a row.
Repeat 3 times a day.
Gradually increase your repetitions until you can do 20 
quick squeezes in a row, it may take a few months to be able to do this.



How can Personal Health help?

Book an appointment with our Women’s Health Chartered Physiotherapist Mary-Kate Ryan to get a thorough pelvic floor assessment and specifically tailored exercise programme.

Similarly, we provide expert led pregnancy Pilates/Yoga classes on site in 16/17 Rathgar road
Please book through our Free App to make an appointment or Ring 01 4964002

Women's Health Physiotherapy Dublin 6

                        It’s as easy as that!!!!

Prenatal yoga, midwife, Dublin 6

Benefits of Prenatal Yoga – by Cathy O’Grady



Pregnancy Yoga girl, Dublin 6

Having a baby is probably one of the most wonderful, yet anxiety-provoking events that can happen in one’s life. Prenatal yoga is a wonderful way to prepare for this event by helping you to remain active & fit throughout your pregnancy, whilst preparing you for the birth of your baby & the early days beyond.




Prenatal yoga encourages you to create space in both body and mind in preparation for the birth of your baby. Movements in our prenatal classes are gentle & are designed to release tension & tightness, increase circulation, build strength & stamina, increase flexibility, whilst easing your body towards opening and releasing, in preparation for the birth of your baby.


Create mind space during pregnancy,



We focus on exercises to target specific areas in the body that are going through great changes, i.e. chest opening exercises to accommodate growing breasts, shoulder & pelvic stabilisation to encourage good posture, accommodating an ever expanding bump. We also focus on postures that are useful in the latter weeks of pregnancy, to ease your baby into an optimal birthing position & postures for use from early labour to delivery.



During pregnancy your body goes through +/- 40 weeks of changes. Prenatal yoga  encourages you to listen to your body & to trust your body. This enables you to adopt a gentle, easy practice on the days when you are lacking energy & a more energetic practice on the days you feel like more.

Prenatal yoga, Dublin6



During pregnancy it is common to experience interrupted sleep and restlessness (??mother nature preparing you for your new-born). We teach our Momas-to-be breathing & relaxation techniques to soothe both body & mind, encouraging deep rest.



Having spent many years working in a busy labour ward, it was always easy to spot the “yoga momas”, they always seemed more calm & in control. Personal Health’s Prenatal yoga classes will equip you on your journey, from early labour, delivery & to those early weeks of motherhood. All of our classes finish with a deep relaxation which allows you the time and space to completely relax, release and let go.

newborn, yoga, labour, childbirth, relaxing pregnancy


Cathy O’Grady runs Prenatal Yoga Classes in Personal Health as follows:

Monday’s @ 11am & 6pm

Saturday’s @ 11.30am


To book classes please download our free app here-

Apple App Store

Google Play Store

or contact us on 

Phone: 01 496 4002




16/17 Rathgar Road

Dublin 6

Balanced approach to your Personal Health

Redress the Balance…… By Susan Duffy Counselling Psychotherapist

As a counselling psychotherapist I meet a lot of people who are struggling with the balancing act of life; workload, children, ageing parents, relationship and friends are among the many responsibilities we try to juggle daily. All of this juggling on a regular basis before even thinking about ourselves, our diet, fitness and general health.

Media and social media can appear full of ‘successful’ people. Supposedly  ‘just like us’ but with perfectly toned bodies, a stellar career and beautifully turned out children. They run marathons before breakfast and roll out a Nigella style roast for 20 close friends at lunch. If we compare ourselves it can be hard not to feel overwhelmed.

  • Are we coming up short….?
  • Or could these images be constructed with ‘perfection’ styling before we clap eyes on the finished product?
Dublin 6 mental health services

As resilient as a bubble or……

feeling tired and depressed

….A spent force?


All of the above add to feelings of overwhelm, anxiety and just not being enough. When we are spinning plates and have such high expectations of ourselves, something’s got to give. Usually because we are busy with work and trying to live up to the perceived expectations of others, the first thing to give is our health and our self-care.

If we are tired, feeling depleted and ragged, it shows in our work and relationships. We can feel demotivated and under-appreciated in work. Anger and resentment can be directed towards loved ones taking us for granted. The basic concept of caring for ourselves in a healthy way underpins how well and whole-heartedly we can care for others, and do our jobs to the best of our abilities.

Surely the correlation between stressed, overworked individuals who strive for perfection and their incidence of back pain, is too high to be a coincidence?

Could it be possible that our tired unsupported bodies are screaming at us to look after them. Sometimes the physical pain we feel can be a symptom of something deeper emotionally. Ironically, lower backs (lumbar spinal) often seem to ‘go’ around stressful landmark life events, when we feel least ‘supported’.

Pausing to ask what your body feels like in this moment, could be the first step in your journey to appropriate self care.

  • What do you truly need right now? (as opposed to what you ‘should’ be doing).
Counselling for Health

What’s going on in there..

It could be deciding to talk to someone about the stressors in your life. What impacts on your relationships and general health?

It could mean taking a step towards a stronger healthier body through exercise, diet or relaxation.

Regardless of detail, pursuing something suitable, exclusively for you, can help positive change.

Come and ask Personal Health how we can help……it’s time to redress your Personal Health balance….



What is Medically Led Fitness ?


Medically Led Fitness Rathmines

listen to your body before looking at it……


What is Medically Led Fitness?

Firstly, it’s fitness classes led by a medically qualified professional.

To expand with some concrete examples;

  • Pregnancy Yoga – Led by a Midwife
  • Pregnancy (pre & post natal) Pilates – A Women’s Health Chartered Physiotherapist
  • Cardiac Rehab (Phase IV) – A Chartered Physiotherapist with further qualification in the delivery of cardiac care
  • ‘LSVT Big’ for Parkinson’s Disease – A Chartered Physiotherapist with expertise in exercise prescription for Parkinson’s patients
  • Lower Back Pain Pilates – A Chartered Physiotherapist medically trained to implement effective Pilates programmes for those specifically suffering with chronic lower back issues
  • 30 Minute Fitness (For All) – A Chartered Physiotherapist and/or Exercise Physiologist keeps you moving engaged/entertained for 30 minutes before or after work

The following are the nuts and bolts of what we do……

From €17 you get access to a qualified healthcare professional for a minimum of 30 minutes.

We have NO memberships – come and go as you please ….Guilt Free .

In a small group environment you can work alongside those with similar issues – a problem shared….

Our Free App makes it easy to work around your busy schedule, bookings are a couple of clicks away. User friendly all the way.

Fitness for chronic health conditions

it sure don’t look like no gym….


Finally this…..A Brief Philosophy

We are not a Gym. We are a Lifestyle Healthcare Clinic.

Our exercise area is spotlessly clean. It smells nice. It has no mirrors.
It looks and feels different.

The place where medical expertise meets practical application

The place where medical expertise meets practical application


We won’t measure or weigh you

If you want objective measurements….?
We provide a Gold Standard Full Health Medical Screening as an optional entry & exit point.

With this service you can measure exactly how exercise improves your overall health, not just your waistline.
Really, it’s all about your internal organ health.
Listening to your body instead of constantly looking at it!
Your systemic health will improve most. And this is sustainable.

Your risk of Cardiovascular disease (CVD) will significantly decrease.
Your heart will be stronger. It’s a muscle.

Similarly, it is likely your cholesterol profile and blood pressure markers will change.
Your lipid (fat) composition will improve, internally and externally.

You will have sharper cognitive skills – concentration capacity, mental stamina, alertness, memory
You’ll sleep better …..
Your energy levels will be less volatile.

In Personal Health it’s not about your waist, your fat, your muscle sculpting…..
[Aesthetic benefits may be a pleasant by-product of what we do together]

Cycling Tips - Chartered Physiotherapist Tim Ahern

All Shapes and Sizes…..

If you don’t turn into an underwear model who cares??
You’ll be significantly more healthy and your quality of life will improve.

We use state of the art technology for patient education. Simplicity & understanding  drives compliance and better results. We have partnered with Irish medical technology firm 3D4Medical


We passionately believe in changing the aesthetic, non sustainable approach to exercise that seems prevalent.Because of our expertise we can modify exercise suitably for all your aches, pains and war wounds.

Facilities at Personal health Lifestyle Healthcare dublin 6

Showers & Changing


Anything else ??? An intangible perhaps……..

You might actually enjoy it, because we’ve done all the thinking for you.

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Phone: 01 496 4002



16/17 Rathgar Road

Dublin 6